Translingual edit

Symbol edit

mos

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Mooré.

English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Noun edit

mos (plural mores)

  1. (rare) singular of mores (moral norms or customs)

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

mos

  1. plural of mo (month; molester)

Anagrams edit

Afrikaans edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Dutch mos, from Proto-Germanic *musą.

Noun edit

mos (plural mosse)

  1. moss

Etymology 2 edit

From Dutch most, from Latin mustum.

Noun edit

mos (uncountable)

  1. must (unfermented or partially fermented grape juice)

Etymology 3 edit

Adverb edit

mos

  1. as you already know (see usage notes)
Usage notes edit

When used as an adverb, mos is used when what is being said is already known (or was known, but perhaps now forgotten) by the listener. For example, if Person A asks Person B, "gaan jy vandag inkopies doen?" (are you going to go shopping today?) and Person B replies, "ja, ek doen mos elke Maandag inkopies" (yes, I go shopping every Monday), then this implies that Person A should already know (or did know at some point, and perhaps forgot) that Person B goes shopping every Monday. If the fact that Person B goes shopping on Mondays was new to Person A, then Person B would reply without using "mos". It is thus also used when making a statement that, while possibly obvious to the listener, is intended to provide context for a following statement.

Albanian edit

Etymology edit

Union of particles mo (un-) and (un-).[1]

Adverb edit

mos

  1. don't

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ Topalli, K. (2017), “mos”, in Fjalor Etimologjik i Gjuhës Shqipe, Durrës, Albania: Jozef, page 1008

Aragonese edit

Etymology edit

From Latin nos, with the initial consonant influenced by the first-person singular object pronoun me (me).

Pronoun edit

mos

  1. Benasquese and Low Ribagorçan form of nos (us, first-person plural dative and accusative pronoun)

References edit

  • nos”, in Aragonario, diccionario castellano–aragonés (in Spanish)

Asturian edit

Pronoun edit

mos

  1. Alternative form of nos

Bikol Central edit

Etymology edit

Shortening of bamos, from Spanish vamos.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

mos

  1. (Tabaco–Legazpi–Sorsogon) to go
    Synonym: madya
    Mos! (Mos na kita!)
    Let's go now!

Related terms edit

Bouyei edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Tai *ʰmɤːlᴮ (new). Cognate with Thai ใหม่ (mài), Northern Thai ᩉ᩠ᨾᩲ᩵, Lao ໃໝ່ (mai), ᦺᦖᧈ (ṁay¹), Tai Dam ꪻꪢ꪿, Shan မႂ်ႇ (màue), Tai Nüa ᥛᥬᥱ (mǎue), Ahom 𑜉𑜧 (maw) or 𑜉𑜨𑜧 (mow), Zhuang moq.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

mos

  1. new

Catalan edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Latin morsus (a bite), from mordeō (bite).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mos m (plural mossos)

  1. bite, mouthful
    Synonyms: mossegada, mossada
  2. bit (metal placed in a horse's mouth)
    Synonym: fre
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From nos, assimilated to the -m ending in reflexive constructions.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

mos (enclitic, contracted 'ns, proclitic ens)

  1. (dialectal, direct or indirect object) us
    Synonym: nos (standard)

Etymology 3 edit

Inherited from Vulgar Latin *mōs, reduced form of Latin meōs.

Pronunciation edit

Determiner edit

mos

  1. masculine plural of mon
Alternative forms edit

Further reading edit

Danish edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse *mós, from Proto-Germanic *mōsą (mush, porridge).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mos c (singular definite mosen, not used in plural form)

  1. mash, puree

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Norse mosi, mose, from Proto-Germanic *musą.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mos n (singular definite mosset, plural indefinite mosser)

  1. moss
Inflection edit

Etymology 3 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

mos

  1. imperative of mose

See also edit

Dutch edit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology edit

From Middle Dutch mos, from Old Dutch *mos, from Proto-West Germanic *mos, from Proto-Germanic *musą.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /mɔs/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: mos
  • Rhymes: -ɔs

Noun edit

mos n (plural mossen, diminutive mosje n)

  1. moss (small seedless plant(s) growing on surfaces)
  2. lichen (symbiotic association(s) of algae and fungi)
  3. (obsolete, rare) swamp, marsh

Derived terms edit

Anagrams edit

Hungarian edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Uralic *mośke-.[1][2]

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

mos

  1. (transitive) to wash something (to clean with water, including brushing one’s teeth)
    Perfectives: megmos, kimos, lemos
    Troponyms: csutakol, öblít, sikál, súrol, suvickol
    Hypernym: tisztít
    kezet, arcot mosto wash one’s hands, face
    fogat mosto brush one’s teeth

Conjugation edit

Derived terms edit

(With verbal prefixes):

Expressions

References edit

  1. ^ Entry #568 in Uralonet, online Uralic etymological database of the Hungarian Research Centre for Linguistics.
  2. ^ mos in Zaicz, Gábor (ed.). Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (‘Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN.  (See also its 2nd edition.)

Further reading edit

  • mos in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’, abbr.: ÉrtSz.). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Anagrams edit

Kalasha edit

Etymology edit

From Sanskrit मांस (māṃsa), from Proto-Indo-Aryan *māmsás, from Proto-Indo-Iranian *māmsás, from Proto-Indo-European *mēmso-.

Noun edit

mos

  1. meat

Latin edit

Etymology edit

Root noun interpreted as s-stem noun of uncertain origin. Generally believed to derive from Proto-Indo-European *moh₁-, *meh₁- (to intend/to be intent upon, to be of strong will), whence Ancient Greek μαίομαι (maíomai, to strive) and perhaps Ancient Greek Μοῦσᾰ (Moûsa, Muse), and also English mood. It has been conjectured that some senses of mōs, such as those having to do with "manner" and "way", may indicate a possible derivation from Proto-Indo-European *med- (to measure), compare and contrast modus; if that is true, it would seem to suggest an example of combined etymology or etymologic conflation.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mōs m (genitive mōris); third declension

  1. manner (of behaving), way (of behaving); behavior, conduct
    Synonym: modus
    • 163 BCE, Publius Terentius Afer, Heauton Timorumenos :
      Quid istuc, quaeso? qui istic mos est, Clitipho? itane fieri oportet?
      Tell me, what are you up to? What sort of behavior’s this, Clitipho? Is this the proper way to act?
    • 27 BCE – 9 BCE, Titus Livius, Ab Urbe Condita Libri 28:
      Ceterum asperitas locorum et Celtiberis, quibus in proelio concursare mos est, velocitatem inutilem faciebat...
      But the roughness of the ground made nimbleness of no use to the Celtiberians, whose manner it is to be skirmishers in battle...
    • 60 CE – 65 CE, Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium Epistula LXXXVI:
      Magna ergo me voluptas subiit contemplantem mores Scipionis ac nostros.
      It was therefore a great pleasure to me to contrast Scipio’s ways with our own.
  2. custom, habit, practice, usage, wont
    Synonyms: habitus, usus, solitum, exemplum
    • 160 BCE, Publius Terentius Afer, Adelphoe :
      Vah! quam vellem etiam noctu amicis operam mos esset dari!
      Oh! How I wish it was the custom to offer services to friends at night as well!
    • 63 BCE, Marcus Tullius Cicero, Oratio in Catilinam Secunda :
      Interfectum esse L. Catilinam et gravissimo supplicio adfectum iam pridem oportebat, idque a me et mos maiorum et huius imperi severitas et res publica postulabat.
      Lucius Catilina ought to have suffered the supreme penalty and been put to death long ago, a course required of me by the practice of our ancestors, the stern tradition of my office, and by interests of state.
    • 41 BCE – 40 BCE, Gaius Sallustius Crispus, De Bello Iugurthino :
      Ceterum mos partium popularium et factionum ac deinde omnium malarum artium paucis ante annis Romae ortus est otio atque abundantia earum rerum quae prima mortales ducunt.
      Furthermore, the usage of political groups and factions, and afterward of all evil practices, originated at Rome a few years before this as the result of peacetime and of an abundance of those things that mortals prize most highly.
    • 40 BCE – 35 BCE, Gaius Sallustius Crispus, Historiae Liber IV :
      ...qui quidem mos ut tabes in urbem coiectus...
      ...which habit, in truth, foisted upon the City, like a plague...
    • 13 BCE, Quintus Horatius Flaccus, Carmina, Liber IV :
      ...nullis polluitur casta domus stupris, mos et lex maculosum edomuit nefas...
      ...the home is pure, unstained by any lewdness, custom and law have gained control over the plague of vice...
    • 60 CE – 65 CE, Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium Epistula XV:
      Mos antiquis fuit usque ad meam servatus aetatem.
      The old Romans had a custom which survived even into my lifetime.
    • 121 CE, Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus, De vita Caesarum Liber VI: Nero:
      Reversus e Graecia Neapolim, quod in ea primum artem protulerat, albis equis introiit disiecta parte muri, ut mos hieronicarum est...
      Returning from Greece, since it was at Naples that he had made his first appearance, he entered that city with white horses through a part of the wall which had been thrown down, as is the custom with victors in the sacred games...
    • 121 CE, Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus, De vita Caesarum Liber VII: Galba:
      ...ut triumphaturi Caesares inde laureas decerperent; fuitque mos triumphantibus, alias confestim eodem loco pangere; et observatum est sub cuiusque obitum arborem ab ipso institutam elanguisse.
      ...moreover it was the habit of those who triumphed to plant other branches at once in that same place, and it was observed that just before the death of each of them the tree which he had planted withered.
  3. (predominantly plural) character; disposition, inclination, temperament
    Synonyms: animus, dispositiō, inclīnātiō, temperamentum
    • 163 BCE, Publius Terentius Afer, Heauton Timorumenos :
      Edepol te, mea Antiphila, laudo et fortunatam iudico, id quom studuisti isti formae ut mores consimiles forent...
      In heaven’s name, my dear Antiphila, I congratulate you and I judge you fortunate, in that you have made it your concern to see that your temperament matches your beauty...
    • 163 BCE, Publius Terentius Afer, Heauton Timorumenos :
      Vobis cum uno semel ubi aetatem agere decretumst viro, quoius mos maxume consimilis vostrum, hi se ad vos applicant.
      With you, on the other hand, once you have decided to live your life with the one man whose disposition is most compatible with yours, they devote themselves to you.
    • 62 BCE – 43 BCE, Marcus Tullius Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares 13.17.3:
      Spondebo enim tibi, vel potius spondeo in meque recipio, eos esse M'. Curii mores eamque quum probitatem, tum etiam humanitatem, ut eum et amicitia tua et tam accurata commendatione, si tibi sit cognitus, dignum sis existimaturus.
      I shall pledge my word to you, or rather give you my promise and solemn undertaking, that such is M'. Curius's character, such his integrity and his kindliness combined, that if you make his acquaintance, you will assuredly deem him worthy of both your friendship and of so elaborate a recommendation.
    • 116 CE, Gaius Cornelius Tacitus, Annales :
      Multa sine dubio saevaque Augustus de moribus adulescentis questus, ut exilium eius senatus consulto sanciretur, perfecerat; ceterum in nullius umquam suorum necem duravit, neque mortem nepoti pro securitate privigni inlatam credibile erat. Propius vero Tiberium ac Liviam, illum metu, hanc novercalibus odiis, suspecti et invisi iuvenis caedem festinavisse. Nuntianti centurioni, ut mos militiae, factum esse quod imperasset, neque imperasse sese et rationem facti reddendam apud senatum respondit.
      It was beyond question that by his frequent and bitter strictures on the youth’s character Augustus had procured the senatorial decree for his exile: on the other hand, at no time did he harden his heart to the killing of a relative, and it remained incredible that he should have sacrificed the life of a grandchild in order to diminish the anxieties of a stepson. More probably, Tiberius and Livia, actuated in the one case by fear, and in the other by stepmotherly dislike, hurriedly procured the murder of a youth whom they suspected and detested. To the centurion who brought the usual military report, that his instructions had been carried out, the emperor rejoined that he had given no instructions and the deed would have to be accounted for in the senate.
  4. will, self-will, humor, caprice
    Synonyms: arbitrium, voluntas
    • 190 BCE, Titus Maccius Plautus, Truculentus :
      Tu dedisti iam, hic daturust: istuc habeo, hoc expeto. Uerum utrique mos geratur amborum ex sententia.
      You have already given, he will still give: yours I have, his I’m seeking. But each of you will be gratified according to your wishes.
    • 191 BCE, Titus Maccius Plautus, Pseudolus :
      Mos tibi geretur. Sed quid hoc, quaeso?
      I will obey you. But what’s this, please?
  5. (transf.) quality, nature, mode, fashion
    • 35 BCE – 34 BCE, Quintus Horatius Flaccus, Satira IX :
      Ibam forte Via Sacra, sicut meus est mos nescio quid meditans nugarum, totus in illis...
      I was strolling by chance along the Sacred Way, a musing after my fashion (literally, as is my custom) on some trifle or other, and wholly intent thereon...
  6. (transf.) precept, law, rule
  7. (plural only) morals, principles
    • 63 BCE, Marcus Tullius Cicero, Oratio in Catilinam Prima :
      O tempora, o mores! Senatus haec intellegit, consul videt; hic tamen vivit. Vivit?
      Shame on the age and on its principles! The senate is aware of these things; the consul sees them; and yet this man lives. Lives?

Declension edit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative mōs mōrēs
Genitive mōris mōrum
Dative mōrī mōribus
Accusative mōrem mōrēs
Ablative mōre mōribus
Vocative mōs mōrēs

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Italian: more
  • Dutch: mores
  • English: meo more, mores
  • French: mœurs
  • Romanian: moare

References edit

  • mos”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mos”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • mos in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • mos in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • according to the present custom, fashion: his moribus
    • to comply with a person's wishes; to humour: alicui morem gerere, obsequi
    • to accomodate oneself to another's wishes: alicuius voluntati morem gerere
    • to improve a person: mores alicuius corrigere
    • moral science; ethics: philosophia, quae est de vita et moribus (Acad. 1. 5. 19)
    • moral science; ethics: philosophia, in qua de bonis rebus et malis, deque hominum vita et moribus disputatur
    • moral precepts: praecepta de moribus or de virtute
    • moral corruption (not corruptela morum): mores corrupti or perditi
    • amongst such moral depravity: tam perditis or corruptis moribus
    • immorality is daily gaining ground: mores in dies magis labuntur (also with ad, e.g. ad mollitiem)
    • something is contrary to my moral sense, goes against my principles: aliquid abhorret a meis moribus (opp. insitum [atque innatum] est animo or in animo alicuius)
    • character: natura et mores; vita moresque; indoles animi ingeniique; or simply ingenium, indoles, natura, mores
    • a sociable, affable disposition: facilitas, faciles mores (De Am. 3. 11)
    • to become customary, the fashion: in consuetudinem or morem venire
    • to introduce a thing into our customs; to familiarise us with a thing: in nostros mores inducere aliquid (De Or. 2. 28)
    • it is customary to..: mos (moris) est, ut (Brut. 21. 84)
    • (ambiguous) the earth brings forth fruit, crops: terra effert (more rarely fert, but not profert) fruges
    • (ambiguous) Vesuvius is discharging flame: Vesuvius evomit (more strongly eructat) ignes
    • (ambiguous) to make an impression on the senses: sensus movere (more strongly pellere)
    • (ambiguous) to die at a good old age: exacta aetate mori
    • (ambiguous) to starve oneself to death: inediā mori or vitam finire
    • (ambiguous) to make a person laugh: risum elicere (more strongly excutere) alicui
    • (ambiguous) to die a natural death: necessaria (opp. voluntaria) morte mori
    • (ambiguous) to court a person's favour; to ingratiate oneself with..: gratiam alicuius sibi quaerere, sequi, more strongly aucupari
    • (ambiguous) to refuse, reject a request: negare, more strongly denegare alicui aliquid
    • (ambiguous) to form a plan, make a resolution: consilium capere, inire (de aliqua re, with Gen. gerund., with Inf., more rarely ut)
    • (ambiguous) a lifelike picture of everyday life: morum ac vitae imitatio
    • (ambiguous) to inspire fear, terror: timorem, terrorem alicui inicere, more strongly incutere
    • (ambiguous) to be cast down, discouraged, in despair: animo esse humili, demisso (more strongly animo esse fracto, perculso et abiecto) (Att. 3. 2)
    • (ambiguous) to disconcert a person: animum alicuius de statu, de gradu demovere (more strongly depellere, deturbare)
    • (ambiguous) to long for a thing, yearn for it: desiderio alicuius rei teneri, affici (more strongly flagrare, incensum esse)
    • (ambiguous) to make sport of, rally a person: illudere alicui or in aliquem (more rarely aliquem)
    • (ambiguous) to give moral advice, rules of conduct: morum praecepta tradere alicui
    • (ambiguous) a stern critic of morals: severus morum castigator
    • (ambiguous) it is traditional usage: more, usu receptum est
    • (ambiguous) according to the custom and tradition of my fathers: more institutoque maiorum (Mur. 1. 1)
    • (ambiguous) to die of wounds: ex vulnere mori (Fam. 10. 33)
  • mos”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • mos”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • Sihler, Andrew L. (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, →ISBN
  • Pokorny, Julius (1959) Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), Bern, München: Francke Verlag

Further reading edit

Old English edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-West Germanic *mos, from Proto-Germanic *musą, whence also Old High German mos.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mos n

  1. moss
Descendants edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Proto-West Germanic *mōs, from Proto-Germanic *mōsą (food).

Akin to Old Saxon mōs (food), Old High German muos (German Mus, Gemüse (food, vegetables), Old English mete (food). More at meat.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mōs n

  1. food, nourishment, victuals
Declension edit
Related terms edit
Descendants edit

Old High German edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-West Germanic *mos, from Proto-Germanic *musą, whence also Old English mos.

Noun edit

mos n

  1. moss

Descendants edit

Old Irish edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Celtic *moxs, from Proto-Indo-European *moḱs, whence also Sanskrit मक्षू (makṣū, fast; early), Avestan𐬨𐬊𐬱𐬎(mošu, soon, quickly), Latin mox (soon). Doublet of moch.

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

mos (preverbal; followed by the dependent form of the verb)

  1. soon
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 28c9
      Fo·mentar mo rígtin-se; mos riccub-sa.
      May you take heed of my arrival; I shall arrive soon.

Related terms edit

Mutation edit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
mos
also mmos after a proclitic
mos
pronounced with /ṽ(ʲ)-/
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading edit

Old Occitan edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

mos

  1. my

See also edit

Penobscot edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Algonquian *mo·swa (it strips), referring to how a moose strips tree bark when feeding: compare Massachusett moos-u (he strips, cuts smooth).[1][2]

Noun edit

mos

  1. moose

Inflection edit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

References edit

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2024), “moose”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.
  2. ^ mos”, in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from German Mass.

Noun edit

mos m (uncountable)

  1. a cup

Declension edit

References edit

  • mos in Academia Română, Micul dicționar academic, ediția a II-a, Bucharest: Univers Enciclopedic, 2010. →ISBN

Swedish edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse *mós, from Proto-Germanic *mōsą (mush, porridge).

Noun edit

mos n

  1. mash, puree, something mashed
    en grillad med mos
    a grilled hot dog with mashed potatoes
    göra mos av någon (idiomatic)
    utterly defeat someone or the like
    (literally, “make mash out of someone”)
Declension edit
Declension of mos 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative mos moset
Genitive mos mosets
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun edit

mos

  1. indefinite genitive singular of mo

References edit

Anagrams edit