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See also: Mos, MOS, mós, , mōs, moš, moș, Moś, mo·s, and mos'

Contents

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

mos (plural mores)

  1. (rare) singular of mores (moral norms or customs)

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for mos in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

AsturianEdit

PronounEdit

mos

  1. Alternative form of nos

CatalanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin morsus (little bits).

NounEdit

mos m (plural mossos)

  1. bite, mouthful
    Synonyms: mossegada, mossada
  2. bit (metal placed in a horse's mouth)
    Synonym: fre

Etymology 2Edit

PronounEdit

mos (enclitic, contracted 'ns, proclitic ens)

  1. us (Dialectal, plural, direct or indirect object). Standard Catalan ens/'ns/-nos.

Etymology 3Edit

DeterminerEdit

mos

  1. masculine plural of mon

Further readingEdit


DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Middle Low German mos.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mos c (singular definite mosen, not used in plural form)

  1. mash, puree

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse mosi, mose.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mos n (singular definite mosset, plural indefinite mosser)

  1. moss
InflectionEdit

Etymology 3Edit

See mose (to mash, to slog).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

mos

  1. imperative of mose

DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch *mos, from Proto-Germanic *musą.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mɔs/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔs

NounEdit

mos n (plural mossen, diminutive mosje n)

  1. moss

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Uralic *muśke- or *mośke- (to wash).[1][2]

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

mos

  1. (transitive) to wash something
  2. (transitive) to brush (teeth)
    fogat mosto brush one's teeth

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

With verbal prefixes
Expressions

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Entry #568 in Uralonet, online Uralic etymological database of the Research Institute for Linguistics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
  2. ^ Zaicz, Gábor. Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (’Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN

KalashaEdit

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Root noun interpreted as s-stem noun of uncertain origin. May be from Proto-Indo-European *mō-, *mē- (endeavour, will, temper), whence Ancient Greek μαίομαι (maíomai, to strive), English mood, or from Proto-Indo-European *meh₁- (to measure). See also modus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mōs m (genitive mōris); third declension

  1. manner, custom, way, usage, practice, habit
    • 63 BCE, Cicero, Catiline Orations (Latin text and English translations here)
      O tempora, o mores! Senatus haec intellegit, consul videt; hic tamen vivit. Vivit?
      Shame on the age and on its principles! The senate is aware of these things; the consul sees them; and yet this man lives. Lives!
  2. humor, self-will, caprice
  3. conduct, behavior
  4. (transf.) quality, nature mode, fashion
  5. (transf.) precept, law, rule
  6. (plural only) character, morals
    • 62 BCE – 43 BCE, Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares 13.17.3:
      Spondebo enim tibi, vel potius spondeo in meque recipio, eos esse M'. Curii mores eamque quum probitatem, tum etiam humanitatem, ut eum et amicitia tua et tam accurata commendatione, si tibi sit cognitus, dignum sis existimaturus.
      I shall pledge my word to you, or rather give you my promise and solemn undertaking, that such is M'. Curius's character, such his integrity and his kindliness combined, that if you make his acquaintance, you will assuredly deem him worthy of both your friendship and of so elaborate a recommendation.

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative mōs mōrēs
Genitive mōris mōrum
Dative mōrī mōribus
Accusative mōrem mōrēs
Ablative mōre mōribus
Vocative mōs mōrēs

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • mos in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mos in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • mos in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • mos in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • according to the present custom, fashion: his moribus
    • to comply with a person's wishes; to humour: alicui morem gerere, obsequi
    • to accomodate oneself to another's wishes: alicuius voluntati morem gerere
    • to improve a person: mores alicuius corrigere
    • moral science; ethics: philosophia, quae est de vita et moribus (Acad. 1. 5. 19)
    • moral science; ethics: philosophia, in qua de bonis rebus et malis, deque hominum vita et moribus disputatur
    • moral precepts: praecepta de moribus or de virtute
    • moral corruption (not corruptela morum): mores corrupti or perditi
    • amongst such moral depravity: tam perditis or corruptis moribus
    • immorality is daily gaining ground: mores in dies magis labuntur (also with ad, e.g. ad mollitiem)
    • something is contrary to my moral sense, goes against my principles: aliquid abhorret a meis moribus (opp. insitum [atque innatum] est animo or in animo alicuius)
    • character: natura et mores; vita moresque; indoles animi ingeniique; or simply ingenium, indoles, natura, mores
    • a sociable, affable disposition: facilitas, faciles mores (De Am. 3. 11)
    • to become customary, the fashion: in consuetudinem or morem venire
    • to introduce a thing into our customs; to familiarise us with a thing: in nostros mores inducere aliquid (De Or. 2. 28)
    • it is customary to..: mos (moris) est, ut (Brut. 21. 84)
    • (ambiguous) the earth brings forth fruit, crops: terra effert (more rarely fert, but not profert) fruges
    • (ambiguous) Vesuvius is discharging flame: Vesuvius evomit (more strongly eructat) ignes
    • (ambiguous) to make an impression on the senses: sensus movere (more strongly pellere)
    • (ambiguous) to die at a good old age: exacta aetate mori
    • (ambiguous) to starve oneself to death: inediā mori or vitam finire
    • (ambiguous) to make a person laugh: risum elicere (more strongly excutere) alicui
    • (ambiguous) to die a natural death: necessaria (opp. voluntaria) morte mori
    • (ambiguous) to court a person's favour; to ingratiate oneself with..: gratiam alicuius sibi quaerere, sequi, more strongly aucupari
    • (ambiguous) to refuse, reject a request: negare, more strongly denegare alicui aliquid
    • (ambiguous) to form a plan, make a resolution: consilium capere, inire (de aliqua re, with Gen. gerund., with Inf., more rarely ut)
    • (ambiguous) a lifelike picture of everyday life: morum ac vitae imitatio
    • (ambiguous) to inspire fear, terror: timorem, terrorem alicui inicere, more strongly incutere
    • (ambiguous) to be cast down, discouraged, in despair: animo esse humili, demisso (more strongly animo esse fracto, perculso et abiecto) (Att. 3. 2)
    • (ambiguous) to disconcert a person: animum alicuius de statu, de gradu demovere (more strongly depellere, deturbare)
    • (ambiguous) to long for a thing, yearn for it: desiderio alicuius rei teneri, affici (more strongly flagrare, incensum esse)
    • (ambiguous) to make sport of, rally a person: illudere alicui or in aliquem (more rarely aliquem)
    • (ambiguous) to give moral advice, rules of conduct: morum praecepta tradere alicui
    • (ambiguous) a stern critic of morals: severus morum castigator
    • (ambiguous) it is traditional usage: more, usu receptum est
    • (ambiguous) according to the custom and tradition of my fathers: more institutoque maiorum (Mur. 1. 1)
    • (ambiguous) to die of wounds: ex vulnere mori (Fam. 10. 33)
  • mos in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • mos in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • Sihler, Andrew L. (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, →ISBN
  • Pokorny, Julius (1959) Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), Bern, München: Francke Verlag

Old EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *musą, whence also Old High German mos.

NounEdit

mos n

  1. moss

DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *mōsą (food). Akin to Old Saxon mōs (food), Old High German muos (German Mus, Gemüse (food, vegetables), Old English mete (food). More at meat.

NounEdit

mōs n

  1. food, nourishment, victuals
DeclensionEdit
Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *musą, whence also Old English mos.

NounEdit

mos n

  1. moss

DescendantsEdit


Old OccitanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mos

  1. my
    • c. 1160, Bernart de Ventadorn, canso:
      Que mos chantars no·m val gaire / Ni mas voutas ni mei so [...].
      For my song little avails me, nor my verses, nor my airs.

See alsoEdit


PenobscotEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Algonquian *mo·swa (it strips), referring to how a moose strips tree bark when feeding: compare Massachusett moos-u (he strips, cuts smooth).[1][2]

NounEdit

mos

  1. moose

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


SwedishEdit

NounEdit

mos n

  1. mash, sauce, jam, something mashed
    en grillad med mos
    a grilled hot dog with mashed potatoes
  2. indefinite genitive singular of mo

DeclensionEdit

Declension of mos 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative mos moset
Genitive mos mosets

Related termsEdit

  1. ^ Online Etymology Dictionary
  2. ^ mos” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.