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EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tɪt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪt

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English tit, titte, tette, from Old English tit, titt, from Proto-Germanic *titt- (teat; nipple; breast), from Proto-Indo-European *tata- (father; parent; nipple). Cognate with Saterland Frisian Tit, Dutch tiet, dialectal Dutch tet, German Zitze, Titte, Yiddish ציצע(tsitse). Probably related to an original meaning “to suck”. Compare Albanian thith (to suck, breast, tit) and teat.

Alternative formsEdit

  • tet (in certain senses only)

NounEdit

tit (plural tits)

  1. A mammary gland, teat.
  2. (slang, vulgar, chiefly in the plural) A woman's breast.
    • 2012, Caitlin Moran, Moranthology, Ebury Press 2012, p. 13:
      I have enjoyed taking to my writing bureau and writing about poverty, benefit reform and the coalition government in the manner of a shit Dickens, or Orwell, but with tits.
  3. (Britain, derogatory, slang) An idiot; a fool.
    Look at that tit driving on the wrong side of the road!
    • 2002, Dick Plamondon, Have You Ever Been Screwed,[1] iUniverse, →ISBN, page 234,
      “What did you say to the cops?” / “I told them everything about the smuggling ring.” / “Why the fuck did you do that?” / “They were nice to me.” / “They’re always nice to people they want to get information from, you dumb tit.”
    • 2012 January 15, Stephen Thompson, "The Reichenbach Fall", episode 2-3 of Sherlock, 00:52:46-00:52:55:
      John Watson (to Sherlock Holmes): It's Lestrade. Says they're all coming over here right now. Queuing up to slap on the handcuffs, every single officer you ever made feel like a tit. Which is a lot of people.
  4. (Britain, slang, derogatory) A police officer; a "tithead".
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Perhaps imitative of light tap. Compare earlier tip for tap (blow for blow), from tip, + tap; compare also dialectal tint for tant.

NounEdit

tit (plural tits)

  1. (archaic) A light blow or hit (now usually in the phrase tit for tat).

VerbEdit

tit (third-person singular simple present tits, present participle titting, simple past and past participle titted)

  1. (transitive or intransitive, obsolete) To strike lightly, tap, pat.
    • 1897 [1607], John Webster, “Northward Hoe”, in The Dramatic Works of John Webster[2], page 203:
      Come tit me, come tat me, come throw a kiss at me—how is that?
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To taunt, to reproach.
    • 1623, James Mabbe, The Rogue: Or The Life of Guzman de Alfarache[3], translation of Guzmán de Alfarache by Mateo Alemán:
      they would vpbraid me therewith calling me idle Drone; Titting and flouting at me, that I should offer to sit downe at boord with cleane hand.

Etymology 3Edit

 
A blue tit

Probably of North Germanic/Scandinavian origin; found earliest in titling and titmouse; compare Faroese títlingur, dialectal Norwegian titling (small stockfish).

 
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Wikispecies

NounEdit

tit (plural tits)

  1. A chickadee; a small passerine bird of the genus Parus or the family Paridae, common in the Northern Hemisphere.
  2. Any of various other small passerine birds.
  3. (archaic) A small horse; a nag.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Tusser to this entry?)
  4. (archaic) A young girl, later especially a minx, hussy.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Burton to this entry?)
  5. A morsel; a bit.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
Derived termsEdit
terms derived from tit Etymology 3
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

AnagramsEdit


ChuukeseEdit

NounEdit

tit

  1. fence, wall
  2. pen (enclosure)

DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse títt (often) and tíðr (frequent), from tíð (time).

AdverbEdit

tit (comparative tiere, superlative tiest)

  1. often
  2. frequently
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Verbal noun to titte (peep, peek), from Old Norse títa (see).

NounEdit

tit n (singular definite tittet, plural indefinite tit)

  1. glimpse
InflectionEdit

FaroeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse þið.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

tit

  1. you (plural)
    Synonym: tykur (Suðuroy)

DeclensionEdit


IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish do·tuit (falls, verb).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tit (present analytic titeann, future analytic titfidh, verbal noun titim, past participle tite)

  1. (intransitive) fall
    1. drop down
    2. collapse
    3. descend
    4. decline
    5. come down to lower level
    6. abate
    7. droop, deteriorate
    8. be overthrown, be killed
    9. lose position

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

  • tit amach (fall out; quarrel; befall, happen, intransitive verb)
  • tit ar (fall on; fall to lot of; decline, drift, towards; descend on; occur on, intransitive verb)
  • titchomhla f (drop-valve)
  • tit chuig, tit chun (pass into state of; accrue to, intransitive verb)
  • tit do (fall into, intransitive verb)
  • tit faoi (fall under, intransitive verb)
  • titghaiste m (fall-trap)
  • tit i (fall into; pass into state of; decline in, intransitive verb)
  • tit isteach le (fall in with; become friendly with, intransitive verb)
  • tit le (fall down along; fall to lot of; chance to get; succeed in doing; draw near to; occur to; fall by; suffer hardship for, intransitive verb)
  • tit thart (drop off, intransitive verb)

Related termsEdit

  • titimeach (falling, tending to fall; caducous, adjective)
  • titimeán m (dropper) (fishing)
  • titimeas m (epilepsy)

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
tit thit dtit
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


KavalanEdit

NounEdit

tit

  1. kingfisher

LashiEdit

PipilEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Nahuan *tlai(h)-. Compare Classical Nahuatl tletl (fire)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tīt

  1. fire
    Shiktali ne kumit pak ne tit
    Put the pot on the fire

Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English teeth.

NounEdit

tit

  1. tooth

Torres Strait CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English teeth.

NounEdit

tit

  1. tooth