See also: Moor and мөөг

EnglishEdit

Headset icon.svg This entry needs audio files. If you have a microphone, please record some and upload them. (For audio required quickly, visit WT:APR.)
Particularly: "British English"
Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Usage notesEdit

more is not a homophone in Northern UK accents, while mooer is homophonous only in those accents.

Etymology 1Edit

Old English mōr. Cognates include Dutch moer, German Moor and perhaps also Gothic 𐌼𐌰𐍂𐌴𐌹 (marei). See mere.

NounEdit

moor (plural moors)

  1. an extensive waste covered with patches of heath, and having a poor, light soil, but sometimes marshy, and abounding in peat; a heath
    A cold, biting wind blew across the moor, and the travellers hastened their step.
    • Carew
      In her girlish age she kept sheep on the moor.
  2. a game preserve consisting of moorland
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From the imperfect past participle moored; present participle and verbal noun mooring. Probably from middle Dutch marren "to tie, fasten or moor a ship" (now only means to procrastinate; > modern terms (aan)meren). See mar.

VerbEdit

moor (third-person singular simple present moors, present participle mooring, simple past and past participle moored)

  1. (intransitive) To cast anchor or become fastened.
  2. (transitive, nautical) To fix or secure, as a vessel, in a particular place by casting anchor, or by fastening with cables or chains; as, the vessel was moored in the stream; they moored the boat to the wharf.
  3. (transitive) To secure or fix firmly.
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

from Moor (North African people, became synonymous with Saracene)

NounEdit

moor m (plural moren, diminutive moortje n)

  1. Something black, notably a black horse
  2. A whistling kettle, used to boil water in, as for tea or coffee

Derived termsEdit

  • moorkop

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


EstonianEdit

NounEdit

moor (??? please provide the genitive and partitive!)

  1. grimalkin

DeclensionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Last modified on 16 April 2014, at 22:42