See also: naïve

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French naïve, from Latin nativus(native, natural).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

naive ‎(comparative more naive, superlative most naive)

  1. Lacking worldly experience, wisdom, or judgement; unsophisticated; against better judgement.
    Surely you're not naive enough to believe adverts!
  2. (of art) Produced in a simple, childlike style, deliberately rejecting sophisticated techniques.
    I've always liked the naive way in which he ignores all the background detail.
  3. (computing) Intuitive; designed to follow the way ordinary people approach a problem.
    • 2007, Takao Terano, ‎Huan Liu, ‎& Arbee L.P. Chen, Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining, ISBN 354045571X:
      We have experiments of running our matching algorithm and a naive matching algorithm for such a term tree and a tree, and have compared the performance of the two algorithms.

SynonymsEdit

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DanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

naive

  1. plural and definite of naiv

EsperantoEdit

AdverbEdit

naive

  1. naively

GermanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

naive

  1. inflected form of naiv

SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

naive

  1. absolute definite natural masculine form of naiv.