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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nūmen.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

numen (plural numina)

  1. A divinity, especially a local or presiding god.
    • 1671, Ralph Cudworth, The True Intellectual System of the Universe, Chapter 4:
      The Egyptians were doubtless the most singular of all the Pagans, and the most oddly discrepant from the rest in their manner of worship; yet nevertheless, that these also agreed with the rest in those fundamentals of worshipping one supreme and universal Numen []
    • 1965, Thomas Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49:
      Where were Secretaries James and Foster and Senator Joseph, those dear daft numina who’d mothered over Oedipa’s so temperate youth?
    • 1985, Anthony Burgess, Kingdom of the Wicked:
      It was the solid and immovable tabernacle of the living numen whose son he had known, though but briefly and not intimately, in the flesh, and whose message he accepted with all his heart.

See alsoEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

  • Could be simply an action noun of *nuō, for *nuimen, from *nuō + -men, thus meaning "a nodding with the head", "a nod", "command", "will" (as nūtus), with the particular meaning of "the divine will", "the will or power of the gods", "divine sway".
  • Others suggest the Ancient Greek word νοούμενον (nooúmenon) ("an influence perceptible by mind but not by senses"), from νοέω (noéō), was borrowed into Early Latin as the word noumen, whose spelling changed to numen in Classical Latin.[1][2]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nūmen n (genitive nūminis); third declension

  1. a nod of the head
  2. divine sway or will
  3. divine power or right
  4. divinity

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (neuter, imparisyllabic non-i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative nūmen nūmina
Genitive nūminis nūminum
Dative nūminī nūminibus
Accusative nūmen nūmina
Ablative nūmine nūminibus
Vocative nūmen nūmina

DescendantsEdit

  • English: numen
  • Italian: nume
  • Portuguese: nume, númen
  • Spanish: numen

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Erasmus, Desiderius, Collected Works of Erasmus University of Toronto Press, 1985, p. 415
  2. ^ Riccioli, Giovanni Battista, Prosodia Bononiensis Reformata, Typis Seminarii Patavii, 1714, p. 47

Old EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

numen

  1. past participle of niman

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin numen.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈnumen/, [ˈnumẽn]

NounEdit

numen m (plural númenes)

  1. numen
  2. muse (source of inspiration)

SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit