See also: orchestră

English edit

 
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Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin orchēstra, itself a borrowing from Ancient Greek ὀρχήστρα (orkhḗstra) (a derivative of ὀρχέομαι (orkhéomai, to dance)).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

 
Orchestra

orchestra (plural orchestras or (rare) orchestrae)

  1. (music) A large group of musicians who play together on various instruments, usually including some from strings, woodwind, brass and/or percussion; the instruments played by such a group.
    • 1941 February, Voyageur, “The Railways of Greece”, in Railway Magazine, page 67:
      It requires quite an orchestra to get a train to start; the guard blows his horn, the stationmaster rings a large bell, and the engine whistles.
    • 2015, Aaron Sorkin, Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs, spoken by Steve Jobs (Michael Fassbender):
      Musicians play their instruments. I play the orchestra.
  2. A semicircular space in front of the stage used by the chorus in Ancient Greek and Hellenistic theatres.
  3. The area in a theatre or concert hall where the musicians sit, immediately in front of and below the stage, sometimes (also) used by other performers.

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

Translations edit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Anagrams edit

French edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

orchestra

  1. third-person singular past historic of orchestrer

Anagrams edit

Italian edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Ancient Greek ὀρχήστρα (orkhḗstra).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /orˈkɛ.stra/
  • Rhymes: -ɛstra
  • Hyphenation: or‧chè‧stra

Noun edit

orchestra f (plural orchestre)

  1. orchestra
  2. band
  3. orchestra pit
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

orchestra

  1. inflection of orchestrare:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading edit

  • orchestra in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Latin edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek ὀρχήστρα (orkhḗstra).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

orchēstra f (genitive orchēstrae); first declension

  1. orchestra (area in front of a stage)

Declension edit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative orchēstra orchēstrae
Genitive orchēstrae orchēstrārum
Dative orchēstrae orchēstrīs
Accusative orchēstram orchēstrās
Ablative orchēstrā orchēstrīs
Vocative orchēstra orchēstrae

Descendants edit

References edit

  • orchestra”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • orchestra”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • orchestra in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • orchestra”, in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]
  • orchestra”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • orchestra”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Piedmontese edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

orchestra f (plural orchestre)

  1. orchestra

Romanian edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from French orchestrer.

Verb edit

a orchestra (third-person singular present orchestrează, past participle orchestrat) 1st conj.

  1. to orchestrate
Conjugation edit

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

orchestra f

  1. definite nominative/accusative singular of orchestră