EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English ovet, from Old English ofett (fruit, legume), from Proto-Germanic *ubatją (fruit, produce, increase), from a compound whose first element represents Proto-Indo-European *obʰi-, *ebʰi-, *bʰi- (on, toward, from, by), and whose second element is Proto-Germanic *at-, *ēta- (edibles, food), from Proto-Germanic *etaną (to eat), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ed- (to eat). Cognate with West Frisian oefte (something tasty to eat, goodies), Dutch ooft (fruit), German Low German Ooft, Aaft (fruit), German Obst (fruit).

PronunciationEdit

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NounEdit

ovest (uncountable)

  1. (Britain dialectal) The mast and acorns of the oak; the turn-out.

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Originated as an incorrect reading of a borrowing from French ouest, from Old English west, from Proto-Germanic *westrą, from earlier *westraz, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *wek(ʷ)speros (evening). Doublet of vespro.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɔ.vest/, [ˈɔːves̪t̪]
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ò‧vest

NounEdit

ovest m (invariable)

 
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  1. west

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit