English edit

 
Acorns.
 Acorn (disambiguation) on Wikipedia

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English acorn, an alteration (after corn) of earlier *akern, from Old English æcern (acorn, oak-mast), from Proto-Germanic *akraną, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ógeh₂ (berry). Cognate with Scots aicorn, Saterland Frisian Äkkene, Tocharian B oko (fruit), Welsh eirin (plums), Breton irin (plum), Irish airne (sloe), Lithuanian úoga, Russian я́года (jágoda, berry), etc.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

acorn (plural acorns)

  1. The fruit of the oak, being an oval nut growing in a woody cup or cupule.
  2. (nautical) A cone-shaped piece of wood on the point of the spindle above the vane, on the mast-head.
  3. (zoology) See acorn-shell.
  4. The glans penis.
    • 2021, A. W. Strouse, Form & Foreskin: Medieval Narratives of Circumsion:
      The Romans, likewise, represented the uncouth Priapus—the god of rustic fertility and sexual assault—as comically well endowed, with his acorn showing.
  5. (slang, usually in the plural) A testicle.

Holonyms edit

  • (fruit of an oak): oak

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

References edit

  • (glans penis): Tony Thorne (2014), “acorn”, in Dictionary of Contemporary Slang, 4th edition, London; []: Bloomsbury

See also edit

Anagrams edit

Middle English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old English æcern, from Proto-West Germanic *akran, from Proto-Germanic *akraną.

The last element of this word is often remodelled on corn.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈaːkər/, /ˈakɔrn/, /ˈaːkɔrn/

Noun edit

acorn

  1. An acorn or similar fruit.

Descendants edit

  • English: acorn
  • Scots: aicorn

References edit