patois

EnglishEdit

English Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia en

EtymologyEdit

1635, from French patois (regional dialect or language). See patois.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

patois (plural patois)

  1. A regional dialect of a language (especially French); usually considered substandard.
  2. Any of various French or Occitan dialects spoken in France.
  3. Creole French in the Caribbean (especially in Dominica, St. Lucia, Trinidad and Tobago and Haiti).
  4. A Jamaican Creole language primarily based on English and African languages but also has influences from Spanish, Portuguese and Hindi.
  5. Jargon or cant.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

French Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia fr

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French patois (local dialect), from Old French patois (incomprehensible speech, rude language), alteration (due to influence of the suffix -ois in words relating to nationalities and languages) of earlier *patoi, a deverbal of Old French patoier (to gesticulate, handle clumsily, paw), from pate (paw), from Vulgar Latin *patta (paw, foot), from Frankish *patta (paw, sole of the foot), from Proto-Germanic *pat-, *paþa- (to walk, tread, go, step), of uncertain origin and relation. Possibly from Proto-Indo-European *(s)pent-/*(s)pat- (path; to walk), a variant of Proto-Indo-European *pent-/*pat- (path; to go). Cognate with Dutch pat, Low German pedden (to step, tread). Related to pad, path.

NounEdit

patois m (plural patois)

  1. patois (French dialect)
  2. patois (any regional dialect)
    On entendait, à côté du lourd patois dorien, retentir les syllabes celtiques bruissantes comme des chars de bataille, Gustave Flaubert - Salammbô, page 29.

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia it

EtymologyEdit

From French patois.

NounEdit

patois m (invariable)

  1. patois

AnagramsEdit

Last modified on 29 March 2014, at 17:14