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See also: Pat, PAT, pAt, p3t, -pat, рат, päť, and pa̍t

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pæt/, [pʰæt], [pʰæt̚], [pʰæˀt̚], enPR: pǎt
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æt

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English *patten, alteration (with loss of medial l) of platten, pletten (to pat), from Old English plættan (to buffet, strike, slap, smack, give a sounding blow), from Proto-Germanic *plat- (to strike, beat), from Proto-Indo-European *b(e)lad-, *b(e)led- (to strike, beat). Cognate with Middle Dutch platten, pletten (to strike, bruise, crush, rub), German platzen (to split, burst, break up), Bavarian patzen (to pat), Swedish plätta, pjätta (to pat, tap). For loss of l, compare patch for platch; pate for plate, etc. See plat.

NounEdit

pat (plural pats)

  1. The sound of a light slap or tap with a soft flat object, especially of a footstep
  2. A light tap or slap, especially with the hands
  3. A flattish lump of soft matter, especially butter or dung.
    • Charles Dickens
      It looked like a tessellated work of pats of butter.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

pat (third-person singular simple present pats, present participle patting, simple past and past participle patted)

  1. To (gently) tap the flat of one's hand on a person or thing.
    To show affection, he decided he would pat the boy on the head.
    • 1877, Anna Sewell, Black Beauty Chapter 22[1]
      He came round to each of us to pat and speak to us for the last time; his voice sounded very sad.
  2. To hit lightly and repeatedly with the flat of the hand to make smooth or flat
    I patted the cookie dough into shape.
    • 1900, L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Chapter 23
      Before they went to see Glinda, however, they were taken to a room of the Castle, where Dorothy washed her face and combed her hair, and the Lion shook the dust out of his mane, and the Scarecrow patted himself into his best shape, and the Woodman polished his tin and oiled his joints.
  3. (Britain, Australia, New Zealand) To stroke or fondle (an animal).
    Do you want to pat the cat?
  4. To gently rain.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

AdjectiveEdit

pat (comparative more pat, superlative most pat)

  1. Timely, suitable, apt, opportune, ready for the occasion; especially of things spoken.
    a pat expression
    • 1788, Cowper, Pity for Africans, p 18
      A story so pat, you may think it is coined.
  2. Trite, being superficially complete, lacking originality.
    • 2010, New York Times, Editorial: Jobs and the Class of 2010, May 23.
      The pat answer is that college students should consider graduate school as a way to delay a job search until things turn around, and that more high school students should go to college to improve their prospects.
Derived termsEdit

AdverbEdit

pat (comparative more pat, superlative most pat)

  1. Opportunely, in a timely or suitable way.
    • c. 1600, William Shakespeare, Hamlet III.iii
      Now might I do it pat
  2. Perfectly.
    He has the routine down pat.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Abbreviation.

NounEdit

pat (plural pats)

  1. Patent.
  2. (knitting) Pattern.
    • 2012, Kari Cornell, Knitting Sweaters from around the World (page 52)
      Work in pat to next underarm marker, sm, place next st on holder []

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Alternative variant of participles patur, pasë, pasur. See pata (I had) (aorist form of kam (I have)) for more.

PronunciationEdit

ParticipleEdit

  1. participle of kam (present)
  2. participle of pata (aorist)

Related termsEdit


AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *pat(i)ō, from Latin patior. Compare Daco-Romanian păți.

VerbEdit

pat (past participle pãtsitã)

  1. I experience, undergo (something bad, unpleasant, unexpected, etc.)

Related termsEdit


BakungEdit

BariaiEdit

NounEdit

pat

  1. stone

ReferencesEdit


BintuluEdit

BununEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Austronesian *Səpat.

NumeralEdit

pat

  1. four

Central MelanauEdit

Central Melanau cardinal numbers
 <  3 4 5  > 
    Cardinal : pat

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-North Sarawak *əpat, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *əpat, from Proto-Austronesian *Səpat.

NumeralEdit

pat

  1. four

ChineseEdit

For pronunciation and definitions of pat – see (“an [[:w:Chinese numbers; etc.”).
(This character, pat, is the Pe̍h-ōe-jī form of .)

ChuukeseEdit

AdjectiveEdit

pat

  1. cold

CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

Via German Patt and French pat, from Italian patta.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pat m

  1. (chess) stalemate
  2. stalemate (blocked situation)

DeclensionEdit

NounEdit

pat f

  1. genitive plural of pata

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French pat, from Italian patta.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pat n (uncountable)

  1. (chess) tie, draw, stalemate

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Italian patta (tie, draw), influenced by mat (mate).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pat m (plural pats)

  1. (chess) stalemate

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit


IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pat n (genitive singular pats, no plural)

  1. gesticulation, gesture

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


IndonesianEdit

Indonesian cardinal numbers
 <  3 4 5  > 
    Cardinal : pat

EtymologyEdit

From Malay pat, shortened form of empat, from Proto-Malayic *əmpat, from Proto-Malayo-Chamic *əmpat, from Proto-Malayo-Sumbawan *əmpat, from Proto-Sunda-Sulawesi *əmpat, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *əpat, from Proto-Austronesian *Səpat.

NumeralEdit

pat

  1. Alternative form of empat

JavaneseEdit

LamaholotEdit

LatvianEdit

ParticleEdit

pat

  1. even

LivonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Akin to Estonian patt.

NounEdit

pat

  1. sin

MaguindanaoEdit

MaiaEdit

NounEdit

pat

  1. stone

MalayEdit

Malay cardinal numbers
 <  3 4 5  > 
    Cardinal : pat

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Shortened form of empat, from Proto-Malayic *əmpat, from Proto-Malayo-Chamic *əmpat, from Proto-Malayo-Sumbawan *əmpat, from Proto-Sunda-Sulawesi *əmpat, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *əpat, from Proto-Austronesian *Səpat.

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

pat (Jawi spelling ڤت)

  1. Alternative form of empat

DescendantsEdit

  • Indonesian: pat

ManggaraiEdit

MaranaoEdit

MarshalleseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Oceanic *pasa.

PronunciationEdit

  • MED phonemes: {pat}
  • IPA(key): /pʲatˠ/, [pʲæ͡ɑtˠ]

NounEdit

pat

  1. swamp

ReferencesEdit


Old JavaneseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Sunda-Sulawesi *əmpat, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *əpat, from Proto-Austronesian *Səpat.

NumeralEdit

pat

  1. four

DescendantsEdit


PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pat m anim

  1. (chess) stalemate

DeclensionEdit


PuyumaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Austronesian *Səpat.

NumeralEdit

pat

  1. four

Rejang KayanEdit

RembongEdit

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Often thought to be from Greek πάτος (pátos, path), but also possibly from Latin pactum (fastened, fixed, planted), with the loss of the -p- in the normal result, *papt, explicable through dissimilation from the initial consonant; compare păta, boteza. [2]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pat n (plural paturi)

  1. bed

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "pat" in Jiří Rejzek, Český etymologický slovník, electronic version, Leda, 2007
  2. ^ Romanian Explanatory Dictionary

ReferencesEdit


SlovakEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French pat.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pat m (genitive singular patu, nominative plural paty, genitive plural patov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. (chess) stalemate

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • pat in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

Tocharian BEdit

NounEdit

pat

  1. stupa

VolapükEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French particularité.

NounEdit

pat (nominative plural pats)

  1. particularity

DeclensionEdit