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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English pate, of uncertain origin. Perhaps a shortened form of Old French patene or Medieval Latin patena, both from Latin patina (pan, dish). Alternatively, perhaps akin to Old Frisian pote (skull).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pate (plural pates)

  1. (somewhat archaic) The head, particularly the top or crown.
    He had a shiny, bald pate.
  2. (archaic) Wit, cleverness, cognitive abilities.
    • 1598, Love's Labour's Lost, by Shakespeare
      I am resolved; 'tis but a three years' fast:
      The mind shall banquet, though the body pine:
      Fat paunches have lean pates, and dainty bits
      Make rich the ribs, but bankrupt quite the wits.
    • 1610, The Tempest, by Shakespeare, act 4 scene 1
      I thank thee for that jest: here's a garment
      for't: wit shall not go unrewarded while I am king of
      this country: 'Steal by line and level,' is an excellent
      pass of pate: there's another garment for't.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Attested since circa 1700, from French pâté, from Old French paste, pastée.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pate (plural pates)

  1. Alternative spelling of pâté (finely-ground paste of meat, fish, etc.)
  2. The interior body, or non-rind portion of cheese, described by its texture, density, and color.

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pate

  1. vocative singular of pat

DanishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French pâté.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pate/, [pʰaˈtˢe]
  • Rhymes: -e

NounEdit

pate c (singular definite pateen, plural indefinite pateer)

  1. pâté

InflectionEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

pate

  1. Rōmaji transcription of パテ

LatinEdit

PaliEdit

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

pate

  1. singular optative active of patati (to fall)

WalloonEdit

NounEdit

pate f (plural pates)

  1. paw, leg