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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French paver (to pave, to cover), from Vulgar Latin *pavāre (to beat down, to smash), from Latin pavīre, present active infinitive of paviō (I beat, strike, ram, tread down).

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: pāv, IPA(key): /peɪv/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪv

VerbEdit

pave (third-person singular simple present paves, present participle paving, simple past and past participle paved)

  1. (Britain) To cover something with paving slabs.
  2. (Canada, US) To cover with stone, concrete, blacktop or other solid covering, especially to aid travel.
  3. (transitive, figuratively) To pave the way for; to make easy and smooth.
    • Rice Baker-Yeboah, The Animal Pathways 1-2 (page 110)
      After two weeks Miguel began to circulate freely about the city in his truck, albeit with the long, chrome-plated pistol cocked and ready on his lap. It wouldn't be for three more years that Gonzo would tell Miguel about the secret leverage that paved his path to freedom.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Danish pauæ (Old Norse páfi), from Old Saxon pavos (Middle Low German pawes, paves), from Old French papes, from Latin pāpa (father).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /paːvə/, [ˈpʰæːwə]

NounEdit

pave c (singular definite paven, plural indefinite paver)

  1. pope

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

LatinEdit

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

NounEdit

pave m (definite singular paven, indefinite plural paver, definite plural pavene)

  1. pope

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

NounEdit

pave m (definite singular paven, indefinite plural pavar, definite plural pavane)

  1. pope

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit