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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French platitude, from plat (flat), from Vulgar Latin *plattus, from Ancient Greek πλᾰτῠ́ς (platús).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈplætɪtjuːd/, /ˈplætɪtuːd/
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NounEdit

platitude (plural platitudes)

  1. An often-quoted saying that is supposed to be meaningful but has become unoriginal or hackneyed through overuse; a cliché.
    • 1918, Algernon Blackwood, chapter XI, in 'The Garden of Survival':
      Beauty, I suppose, opens the heart, extends the consciousness. It is a platitude, of course.
    • 1922, Michael Arlen, “2/1/2”, in “Piracy”: A Romantic Chronicle of These Days[1]:
      Semiramis was the first woman to invent eunuchs and women have had sympathy for them ever since; [] and women can tell them what they can't tell other men. And Ivor, suddenly cheered by laughing at his absurd platitudes, and finding himself by the door, was going from the room.
    • 2019 August 30, Jonathan Watts, “Amazon fires show world heading for point of no return, says UN”, in The Guardian[2]:
      For most of the past three decades, the natural world was treated almost as an afterthought by world leaders. If discussed at all, it was with platitudes about the need to save polar bears and tigers.
  2. Unoriginality; triteness.
  3. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) A claim that is trivially true, to the point of being uninteresting.

QuotationsEdit

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French platitude.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

platitude f (plural platitudes, diminutive platitudetje n)

  1. platitude, cliché

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

platitude f (plural platitudes)

  1. platitude (an overused saying)
  2. platitude; triteness; unoriginality

SynonymsEdit