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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

The noun is derived from Middle English plat, platte (flat part of a sword; flat piece of ground, plot of ground),[1] probably a variant of Middle English plot,[2] (modern English plot)[3] and influenced by Middle English plat, plate[4] (modern English plate) and Anglo-Norman, Middle French and Old French plat.[5]

The verb is derived from the noun.[6]

NounEdit

plat (plural plats)

  1. A plot of land; a lot.
    • 1621, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], “Ayre Rectified. With a Digression of the Ayre.”, in The Anatomy of Melancholy, Oxford: Printed by Iohn Lichfield and Iames Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 216894069; The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd corrected and augmented edition, Oxford: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, 1624, OCLC 54573970, partition 2, section 2, member 3, page 220:
      The best ſoyle commonly yeelds the worſt Ayre, a dry ſandy plat is fitteſt to build upon, and ſuch as is rather hilly then plaine, full of Downes, a Cotſwald county, as being moſt commodious for hawking, hunting, wood, waters, and all manner of pleaſures.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book VIII”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker [] [a]nd by Robert Boulter [] [a]nd Matthias Walker, [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554, lines 455–457:
      Such pleaſure took the Serpent to behold / This Flourie Plat, the ſweet receſs of Eve / Thus earlie, thus alone; [...]
    • 1842, Alfred Tennyson, “The Blackbird”, in Poems. [...] In Two Volumes, volume I, London: Edward Moxon, [], OCLC 1008064829, stanza I, page 208:
      O Blackbird! sing me something well: / While all the neighbours shoot thee round, / I keep smooth plats of fruitful ground, / Where thou may’st warble, eat, and dwell.
    • 1913 April, Lela Angier Lenfest, “The Garden of ‘The Rosary’”, in Sunset: The Pacific Monthly, volume 30, number 4, San Francisco, Calif.: H. S. Crocker, ISSN 0039-5404, OCLC 228662542, page 353:
      [W]e come to a spot which must have been a favorite resting-place for the poet, a low stone seat under a huge live oak, with a formal plat of grass and a stone seat opposite.
  2. A map showing the boundaries of real properties (delineating one or more plots of land), especially one that forms part of a legal document.
    • 1580, Richard Hakluyt, “Notes in Writing, besides More Priuie by Mouth, that were Giuen by M. Richard Hakluyt, [], Anno 1580: To M. Arthur Pet, and to M. Charles Iackman, Sent by the Merchants of the Moscouie Companie for the Discouerie of the Northeast Straight, []”, in The Principall Navigations, Voiages, and Discoveries of the English Nation, [], imprinted at London: By George Bishop and Ralph Newberie, deputies to Christopher Barker, printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majestie, published 1589, OCLC 753964576, page 460:
      For which cauſe I wiſh you to enter into conſideration of the matter, & to note all the Iſlands, and to ſet them downe in plat, to two ends: that is to ſay, That we may deuiſe to take the benefit by them, And alſo foreſee how by them the Sauages or ciuill Princes may in any ſort annoy us in our purpoſed trade that way.
    • 1888, John W[orth] Kern, official reporter, “The City of Indianapolis v. Patterson”, in Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the Supreme Court of Judicature of the State of Indiana, [], volume 112, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bowen-Merrill Co., law publishers, OCLC 23102125, headnote:
      A husband can not, without authority from his wife, plat her land, and the fact that the land which he assumes to plat was omitted by mistake from a previous plat made and acknowledged by her can make no difference.
    • 1982, Robert N[eil] Corley; Peter J. Shedd; Charles F. Floyd, Real Estate and the Law, New York, N.Y.: Business Division, Random House, →ISBN, page 174; Charles F. Floyd; Marcus T. Allen, “Public Restrictions on Ownership”, in Real Estate Principles, 7th edition, Chicago, Ill.: Dearborn Real Estate Education, Dearborn Financial Publishing, 2002, →ISBN, page 75:
      The purpose of the preapplication conference is to allow the developer to meet informally with the planning board before going to the expense of preparing a formal plat.
    • 2005 November 23, Aharon N. Varady, “Bond Hill, Ohio, 1870–1903”, in Bond Hill: Origin and Transformation of a 19th Century Cincinnati Metro-Suburb, 10th edition, Cincinnati, Oh.: Henry Watkin Press & Cosmographic Design Initiates, →ISBN, page 76:
      In 1877, a formal plat of the unincorporated village was published [...]. The publication of the plat, seven years after the village was laid out, likely reflected the beginning of the process toward formal incorporation of the municipality.
  3. (obsolete) A plot, a scheme.
    • 1582 July 9, Robert Bowes, “CCXXV.—‘To Sir Francis Walsingham, ix July 1583.’ From the Letter-Book, p. 223.”, in [Joseph] Stevenson, editor, The Correspondence of Robert Bowes, of Aske, Esquire, the Ambassador of Queen Elizabeth in the Court of Scotland (The Publications of the Surtees Society), London: J[ohn] B[owyer] Nichols and Son, []; William Pickering, []; Edinburgh: Laing and Forbes, published 1842, OCLC 2027787, page 488:
      Besides some care is taken, so far as conveniently can be, both to give regard to the further spring of any matter tending to the entry or execution of any other or evil plat, and also upon the sight thereof, to have timely recourse to the King, to warn him and others to beware and provide for the seasonable prevention of the danger; [...]
    • 1589, George Puttenham, chapter XII, in The Arte of English Poesie: [], London: Printed by Richard Field, [], OCLC 837484536; republished as Jos[eph] Haslewood, editor, The Arte of English Poesie, London: Printed by Harding and Wright, [], for Robert Triphook, [], 1811, OCLC 912994675, book II (Of Proportion Poetical), page 90:
      [S]o shall our plat in this one point be larger and much surmount that which [Richard] Stanihurst first tooke in hand by his exameters dactilicke and spondaicke in the translation of Virgills Eneidos, [...]
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

plat (third-person singular simple present plats, present participle platting, simple past and past participle platted)

  1. (transitive) To create a plat; to lay out property lots and streets; to map.
    • 1888, John W[orth] Kern, official reporter, “The City of Indianapolis v. Patterson”, in Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the Supreme Court of Judicature of the State of Indiana, [], volume 112, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bowen-Merrill Co., law publishers, OCLC 23102125, headnote:
      A husband can not, without authority from his wife, plat her land, and the fact that the land which he assumes to plat was omitted by mistake from a previous plat made and acknowledged by her can make no difference.
    • 1902 June 19, Justice Horatio Rogers Jr.; Edward C. Stiness, reporter, “Ellen Dawson et al. vs. Robert Broome”, in Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the Appellate Division of the Supreme Court of Rhode Island, volume 24, Providence, R.I.: E. L. Freeman & Sons, printers to the state, published 1903, OCLC 180774178, page 371:
      He platted his land, extending the lateral lines of the lots south of Shore, or India street, indefinitely out into the river.
    • 1913 January 6, Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, “Tesson v. H. K. Porter Co.”, in The Atlantic Reporter (National Reporter System, State Series), volume 86, permanent edition, St. Paul, Minn.: West Pub. Co., OCLC 19332645, page 278:
      [...] it may vacate a street where the original Owner has merely platted his land to conform to streets already located and established by the municipality, where no lot has been sold by such owner prior to such vacation.
    • 2005, Carolyn Cartier, “San Francisco and the Left Coast”, in Carolyn Cartier and Alan A. Lew, editors, Seductions of Place: Geographical Perspectives on Globalization and Touristed Landscapes (Critical Geographies; 19), Abingdon, Oxfordshire; New York, N.Y.: Routledge, →ISBN, page 138:
      Vistas in San Francisco—a city whose real estate development platted out land geometrically and gridded over a series of hills—offer vertical, stunning viewscapes of architecture and the Bay, natural and built environments.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

The noun is a variant of plait.[7]

The verb is from Middle English platte, English plat, respectively archaic past and past participle forms of English pleat[8] (a variant of plait),[9] Middle English platten (to braid, weave; plait; to fold).[10]

NounEdit

plat (plural plats)

  1. A braid; a plait (of hair, straw, etc.).
    • 1609, William Shakespeare, “A Louers Complaint”, in Shake-speares Sonnets. Neuer before Imprinted[1], London: By G[eorge] Eld for T[homas] T[horpe] and are to be sold by William Aspley, OCLC 216596634:
      Her haire nor looſe nor ti'd in formall plat, / Proclaimd in her a careleſſe hand of pride; [...]
    • c. 1806, record in the journals of Lewis and Clark, recorded in The United States Exploration Anthology (2013, →ISBN):
      they also wear a cap or cup on the head formed of beargrass and cedar bark. the men also frequently attatch[sic] some small ornament to a small plat of hair on the center of the crown of their heads.
    • 1830, The Ladies’ Museum, volume 31, page 59:
      [...] hair ornamented with a bandeau of gold on one side of the forehead, with a large pearl in the centre of the bandeau; on the opposite side is a plat of hair.
  2. Material produced by braiding or interweaving, especially a material of interwoven straw from which straw hats are made.
    • 1824, New Material for Straw Plat, in The New England Farmer, volume 2, page 316:
      The large silver medal and twenty guineas, were this Session given to Miss Sophia Woodhouse, (Mrs. Wells,) of Weathersfield, in Connecticut, United States, for a new Material for Straw Plat.
    • 1829, On British Leghorn Plat for Hats and Bonnets, by Lady Harriet Bernard, in Gill’s Technological Repository, volume 4, page 381:
      Her Ladyship, in a letter to A. Aikin, Esq., [...] dated Castle Bernard, Ireland, Oct. 19, 1827, states that she has made some improvement in the mode of preparing the rye-straw, which is the material for plat employed in the school under her ladyship’s patronage.
    • 1842, The Penny Cyclopædia of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge, volume 23:
      Mr. Corston states that 781,605 straw hats had been imported from 1794 to 1803; and that in the last four years of that period 5281 lbs. of straw-plat, which was equal to 26,405 hats, had also been brought to this country.
    • 2000, Whittington Bernard Johnson, Race Relations in the Bahamas, 1784–1834:
      Eleuthera made palmetto plat for hats, arrowroot, and casaba starch.
    • 2002, John McAllister Ulrich, Signs of Their Times →ISBN, page 45
      The most detailed example of this particular mode of production occurs in the section of Cottage Economy devoted to the making of straw plat for hats, fashioned from raw material grown in England.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

plat (third-person singular simple present plats, present participle platting, simple past and past participle platted)

  1. (dated except regional England) To braid, to plait.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, [] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, [], OCLC 964384981, Matthew 27:29:
      And when they had platted a crowne of thornes, they put it upon his head, and a reed in his right hand: and they bowed the knee before him, and mocked him, ſaying, haile king of the Jewes.
    • 1844, Thomas Jefferson Jacobs, Scenes, Incidents, and Adventures in the Pacific Ocean, page 349:
      A customer hailed him; he placed the stool on the ground, and the customer seated himself upon it, while the barber shaved his face, platted his hair, and washed his hands [...]
    • 2006, Elka Paquette, Taboo →ISBN, page 100:
      She platted her hair in segments the night before, so that today she’d have a rippling effect through her hair.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English plat, plate, platte (flat; smooth; blunt, plain),[11] from Anglo-Norman, Middle French, and Old French plat ((adjective) flat, level; calm; blunt, plain; (adverb) in a flat position; directly, straight; bluntly, plainly), from Vulgar Latin *plattus (flat; smooth); further etymology uncertain, but possibly from Ancient Greek πλατύς (platús, flat; wide), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *pleth₂- (flat). The English word is cognate with French plat, Italian piatto, Middle Dutch plat (modern Dutch plat (flat)), Middle High German blat, plat, Middle Low German plat (modern German platt (flat)), Old Danish plat (modern Danish plat), Old Occitan plat (modern Occitan plat), Old Swedish plat (modern Swedish platt); and is a doublet of flat.[12]

AdjectiveEdit

plat (comparative more plat, superlative most plat)

  1. (obsolete except Scotland) Flat; level; (by extension) frank, on the level.
    • [c. 1386–1390, John Gower, “Book I”, in Reinhold Pauli, editor, Confessio Amantis of John Gower: Edited and Collated with the Best Manuscripts, volume I (in Middle English), London: Bell and Daldy [], published 1857, OCLC 827099568, page 57:
      He lith down his one ere al plat / Unto the grounde and halt it faſte [...]
      (please add an English translation of this quote)]
    • c. 1400, John Lydgate, poem, commented upon by Thomas Gray and printed in The Works of Thomas Gray, volume 5, page 305:
      But, crying mercy, the emperour lay plat on the ground.
    • 1889, Henry Morley, Early Prose Romances: The history of Reynard the Fox, page 149:
      But else, hold alway[sic] your tail fast between your legs that he catch you not thereby; and hold down your ears lying plat after your head that he hold you not thereby; and see wisely to yourself.
    • 1891, Arthur Conan Doyle, The White Company:
      But now, youngster, I have answered you freely, and I trow it is time that you answered me. Let things be plat and plain between us. I am a man who shoots straight at his mark.
    • 2011, Gordon Kendall, MHRA Tudor & Stuart Translations, volume 7.II: Gavin Douglas, The Aenid (1513) →ISBN, page 638:
      The whirling wheel and speedy swift axle-tree / Smat down to ground, and on the earth lay plat.

AdverbEdit

plat (comparative more plat, superlative most plat)

  1. (obsolete except Scotland) Flatly, plainly.
    Synonyms: bluntly, directly, straightforwardly
    • [c. 1360s, Geffray Chaucer [i.e., Geoffrey Chaucer], “The Romaunt of the Rose”, in [William Thynne], editor, The Workes of Geffray Chaucer Newlye Printed, [] (in Middle English), [London]: Printed by [Richard Grafton for] Iohn Reynes [], published 1542, OCLC 932884868, folio clxv, verso, column 1:
      But, ſir, ye lye, I tel you plat [...]
      But, sir, you lie, I tell you plainly [...]]
    • c. 1547‒1555, John Hooper, A Declaration of the Ten Commandments, published by the Parker Society in 1843:
      Fourth, see [that] thou hide nothing, nor dissemble, but speak plat, and plainly as much as thou knowest.
    • c. 1584‒1656, Joseph Hall:
      But single out, and say once plat and plain / That coy Matrona is a courtesan;

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ plat, n.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 28 January 2019.
  2. ^ plot, n.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 28 January 2019.
  3. ^ plat, n.3”, in OED Online  , Oxford: Oxford University Press, June 2006; “plat” in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press.
  4. ^ plā̆t(e, n.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 28 January 2019.
  5. ^ Compare “plat, n.2”, in OED Online  , Oxford: Oxford University Press, June 2006.
  6. ^ plat, v.4”, in OED Online  , Oxford: Oxford University Press, June 2006.
  7. ^ plat, n.6”, in OED Online  , Oxford: Oxford University Press, June 2006.
  8. ^ plat, v.3”, in OED Online  , Oxford: Oxford University Press, June 2006.
  9. ^ pleat, v.”, in OED Online  , Oxford: Oxford University Press, June 2006.
  10. ^ platten, v.(3)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 28 January 2019.
  11. ^ plat, adj.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 28 January 2019.
  12. ^ plat, adj. and adv.”, in OED Online  , Oxford: Oxford University Press, June 2006.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Substantivization of the archaic adjective plat (compare French plat (flat)), from Old Occitan, from Vulgar Latin *plattus, from Ancient Greek πλατύς (platús, flat).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

plat m (plural plats)

  1. plate
  2. dish

Related termsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From platit (to pay) derived from Proto-Slavic *platъ (a piece of cloth),[1] as pieces of cloth were used as currency. Possibly cognate with plátno (canvas, linen).

NounEdit

plat m

  1. salary
    nástupní plat — starting salary
    základní plat — basic salary
DeclensionEdit
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

plat

  1. genitive plural of plato

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "plat" in Jiří Rejzek, Český etymologický slovník, electronic version, Leda, 2007

Further readingEdit


DanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

plat

  1. inane, lacking inspiration, corny, insipid
    • 2016, Anne Strandvad, Vejen til Sofie, Lindhardt og Ringhof →ISBN
      De ting, hun lavede, var platte og måtte klemmes ud af pligt. Først når de andre spillede dem, blev de til andet end livløse slag på klaveret.
      The things she made were uninspired and had to be squeezed out by duty. It was only when others played them that they became anything else than lifeless beatings on the piano.
    • 2006, Min krønike: 1932-1979, Gyldendal A/S →ISBN, page 150
      Jeg fandt, at især de sidste fire linjer i visen var platte og stødende.
      I found that, in particular, the last four lines in the song were inane and offensive.
    • 2016, Jørgen Thorgaard, Kolonien, Lindhardt og Ringhof →ISBN
      Enhver var af den opfattelse, Ladegaards morsomheder var platte.
      Everyone was of the view that Ladegaard's jokes were corny.
    • 2011, Irene Oestrich, Slip bekymringerne, Politikens Forlag →ISBN
      ... at de syntes Carolines bemærkninger var platte, ...
      ... that they felt Caroline's remarks to be stupid, ...
    • 1986, Eske Holm, Den erotiske handel: roman
      Mænds fascination af Martin berørte ham meget lidt. Han syntes dog bøsserne var besværlige – han syntes, de oftest var platte og seksuelt fikserede.
      The fascination that men held for Martin affected him very little. He did however feel that the gays were troublesome – he felt that they were most often insipid and sexually fixated.

InflectionEdit

Inflection of plat
Positive Comparative Superlative
Common singular plat plattere plattest2
Neuter singular plat plattere plattest2
Plural platte plattere plattest2
Definite attributive1 platte plattere platteste
1) When an adjective is applied predicatively to something definite, the corresponding "indefinite" form is used.
2) The "indefinite" superlatives may not be used attributively.

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /plɑt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɑt

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch plat, from Old French plat, from Vulgar Latin *plattus.

AdjectiveEdit

plat (comparative platter, superlative platst)

  1. flat
    De wereld is plat.
    The world is flat.
  2. of soft consistency
    platte kaas
    soft cheese (quark, creamy cheese)
    platte kak
    soft stool
InflectionEdit
Inflection of plat
uninflected plat
inflected platte
comparative platter
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial plat platter het platst
het platste
indefinite m./f. sing. platte plattere platste
n. sing. plat platter platste
plural platte plattere platste
definite platte plattere platste
partitive plats platters
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

From Platduits, which originally referred to any dialect specific to the low countries.

NounEdit

plat n (uncountable)

  1. One’s local dialect.
    Kan jij plat praten?
    Can you speak the dialect?

AdjectiveEdit

plat (comparative platter, superlative platst)

  1. as one’s local dialect
    In de realityserie Oh Oh Cherso spraken de deelnemers plat Haags.
    The participants in the reality show Oh Oh Cherso spoke dialectal Dutch from the Hague.
  2. (by extension) common, rural, vulgar
    een platte mop
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French plat, from Old French plat, from Vulgar Latin *plattus, from Ancient Greek πλατύς (platús, broad, flat).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

plat (feminine singular plate, masculine plural plats, feminine plural plates)

  1. flat

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

NounEdit

plat m (plural plats)

  1. a flat area of ground; a flat thing; a flat dish or receptacle
  2. dish or course (e.g. served in a restaurant)

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

plat

  1. Romanization of 𐍀𐌻𐌰𐍄

Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

plat m (oblique plural plaz or platz, nominative singular plaz or platz, nominative plural plat)

  1. a footbridge

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French plat.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

plat m or n (feminine singular plată, masculine plural plați, feminine and neuter plural plate)

  1. flat, level, even

DeclensionEdit

NounEdit

plat n (plural [please provide])

  1. The high first tone in Hanyu pinyin

SynonymsEdit


SlovakEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

plat m (genitive singular platu, nominative plural platy, genitive plural platov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. salary

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • plat in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk