English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Noun edit

poe (plural poes)

  1. (archaic) Alternative form of po (chamberpot)
    • 1984, Frank L. Mills, Simon B. Jones-Hendrickson, Bertram Eugene, Christmas Sports in St. Kitts-Nevis: Our Neglected Cultural Tradition:
      He looked for his enamel chamber pot — or poe in local parlance — whose better days had long gone: the handle was broken, there were a few rusted holes, and it was covered with a myriad of spalls. The poison of the fish soon had him vomiting in the poe.

Etymology 2 edit

Derived from the Hokkien (“poe”)

Noun edit

poe

  1. moon blocks.
    poe divination

Anagrams edit

Estonian edit

Noun edit

poe

  1. genitive singular of pood

Hawaiian edit

Etymology 1 edit

Verb edit

poe

  1. (stative) round, rounded
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from English boy.

Noun edit

poe

  1. boy

Etymology 3 edit

Borrowed from English buoy.

Noun edit

poe

  1. buoy

Italian edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɔ.e/
  • Rhymes: -ɔe
  • Hyphenation: pò‧e

Noun edit

poe f

  1. plural of poa

Old French edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Vulgar Latin *pauta. Attested from the early twelfth century onward.

Pronunciation edit

(central pronunciations)

Noun edit

poe oblique singularf (oblique plural poes, nominative singular poe, nominative plural poes)

  1. paw
  2. animal's foot
  3. claw

Descendants edit

  • Middle Breton: pau
  • Middle English: pawe, pauwe, powe
  • Middle Irish: pói

References edit