See also: Boy and bõy

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

 
Painting of a boy (c. 1811)
 
Two Arab boys (c. 1910)

From Middle English boy, boye (servant, commoner, knave, boy), from Old English bōia (boy), from Proto-Germanic *bōjô (younger brother, young male relation), from Proto-Germanic *bō- (brother, close male relation), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰā-, *bʰāt- (father, elder brother, brother). Cognate with Scots boy (boy), West Frisian boai (boy), Middle Dutch boi, booi (boy), Low German Boi (boy), and probably to the Old English proper name Bōia. Also related to West Flemish boe (brother), Norwegian dialectal boa (brother), Dutch boef (rogue, knave), German Bube ("boy; knave; jack"; > English bub), Icelandic bófi (rogue, crook, bandit, knave). See also bully.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

boy (countable and uncountable, plural boys)

  1. A young male. [from 15th c.]
    Kate is dating a boy named Jim.
    1. (particularly) A male child or teenager, as distinguished from infants or adults.
      • 1876, Frances Eliza Millett Notley, The Kiddle-a-Wink, "A Tale of Love", page 169:
        "He is not quite a baby, Alfred," said Ellen, "though he is only a big stupid boy. We have made him miserable enough. Let us leave him alone."
  2. (diminutive) A male child: a son of any age.
  3. (endearing, diminutive) A male of any age, particularly one rather younger than the speaker. [from 17th c.]
  4. (obsolete) A male of low station, (especially as pejorative) a worthless male, a wretch; a mean and dishonest male, a knave. [14th-17th c.]
  5. (now rare and usually offensive outside some Commonwealth nations) A male servant, slave, assistant, or employee, [from 14th c.] particularly:
    • c. 1300, King Horn, line 1075:
      þe boye hit scholde abugge; Horn þreu him ouer þe brigge.
    • 1899 Feb, Joseph Conrad, “The Heart of Darkness”, in Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, page 211:
      He allowed his ‘boy’ - an overfed young negro from the coast - to treat the white men, under his very eyes, with provoking insolence.
    • 1973, Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow, i, 37:
      ‘Why does he go out and pinch all his dogs in person? He's an administrator, isn't he? Wouldn't he hire a boy or something?’
      ‘We call them “staff”,’ Roger replies.
    1. A younger such worker.
      • 1721, Penelope Aubin, The Life of Madam de Beaumount, ii, 36:
        I resolved to continue in the Cave, with my two Servants, my Maid, and a Boy, whom I had brought from France.
    2. (historical or offensive) A non-white male servant regardless of age, [from 17th c.] particularly as a form of address.
      • 1625, W. Hawkins in Samuel Purchas, Hakluytus Posthumus or Purchas his Pilgrimes, Vol. I, iii, vii, 211:
        My Boy Stephen Grauener.
      • 1834, Edward Markham, New Zealand or Recollections of It, 72:
        They picked out two of the strongest of the Boys (as they call the Men) about the place.
      • 1876, Ebenezer Thorne, The Queen of the Colonies, or, Queensland as I Knew It, 58:
        The blacks who work on a station or farm are always, like the blacks in the Southern States, called boys.
      • 1907 May 13, N.Y. Evening Post, 6:
        [In Shanghai,] The register clerk assigns you to a room, and instead of ‘Front!’ he shouts ‘Boy!’
      • 1959, Anthony Burgess, Beds in the East (The Malayan Trilogy), published 1972, page 521:
        He thrust his head into the aisle. "Boy!" A Chinese in a white coat responded listlessly. "What will you have? Beer?"
      • 1960 February 5, Northern Territory News, 5/5:
        Aborigine Wally... described himself as ‘number one boy’ at the station.
    3. (obsolete) A male camp follower.
  6. (now offensive) Any non-white male, regardless of age. [from 19th c.]
    • 1812, Anne Plumptre translating Hinrich Lichtenstein, Travels in Southern Africa, in the Years 1803, 1804, 1805, and 1806, Vol. I, i, viii, 119:
      A Hottentot... expects to be called by his name if addressed by any one who knows it; and by those to whom it is not known he expects to be called Hottentot... or boy.
    • 1888, Louis Diston Powles, Land of Pink Pearl, or Recollections of Life in the Bahamas, 66:
      Every darky, however old, is a boy.
    • 1973 September 8, Black Panther, 7/2:
      [In Alabama,] Guards still use the term ‘boy’ to refer to Black prisoners.
    • 1979, Bert Newton and Mohammed Ali, The Logie Awards:
      BN: [repeating a catchphrase] I like the boy.
      MA: [to hostile audience] Hold it, hold it, hold it. Easy. Did you say ‘Roy’ or ‘boy’?
      BN: ‘I like the boy’. There's nothing wrong with saying that... Hang on, hang on, hang on... I'll change religion, I'll do anything for ya, I don't bloody care... What's wrong with saying that? ‘I like the boy’?
      MA: Boy...
      BN: I mean, I like the man. I'm sorry, Muhammad.
  7. A male animal, especially, in affectionate address, a male dog. [from 15th c.]
    C'mere, boy! Good boy! Who's a good boy?
    Are you getting a boy cat or a girl cat?
  8. (historical, military) A former low rank of various armed services; a holder of this rank.
    • 1841 May 6, Times in London, 5/4:
      Wounded... 1 Boy, 1st class, severely.
    • 1963 April 30, Times in London, 16/2:
      He joined the Navy as a boy second class in 1898.
  9. (US, slang, uncountable) Heroin. [from 20th c.]
  10. (somewhat childish) A male (tree, gene, etc).
    • 1950, Pageant:
      Are there “boy” trees and “girl” trees? Yes. A number of species, among them the yew, holly and date-bearing palm, have their male and female flowers on different trees. The male holly, for instance, must be planted fairly close to the female ...
    • 1970 [earlier 1963], Helen V. Wilson, Helen Van Pelt, Helen Van Pelt's African Violets, Dutton Adult (→ISBN):
      Of the 100 percent total, 25 will have two girl genes, 50 will have one boy and one girl gene, and 25 will have two boy genes.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Alternative formsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Cebuano: boy
  • Dutch: boy
  • French: boy
  • Italian: boy
  • Jamaican Creole: bwoy
  • Sranan Tongo: boy
  • Vietnamese: bồi

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

InterjectionEdit

boy

  1. Exclamation of surprise, pleasure or longing.
    Boy, that was close!
    Boy, that tastes good!
    Boy, I wish I could go to Canada!
    • 2020 December 2, Paul Bigland, “My weirdest and wackiest Rover yet”, in Rail, page 68:
      Time is running out, so I renounce a spin on a Class 387 for a fast run to Paddington on another Class 800 - a shame as the weather was perfect for pictures. Even so, it's enjoyable - boy, can those trains shift under the wires.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

boy (third-person singular simple present boys, present participle boying, simple past and past participle boyed)

  1. To use the word “boy” to refer to someone.
    Don't boy me!
  2. (transitive) To act as a boy (in allusion to the former practice of boys acting women's parts on the stage).

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Webster's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967

AnagramsEdit


AzerbaijaniEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Turkic *bod (body, stature; self; kin, tribe, etc).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

boy (definite accusative boyu, plural boylar)

  1. height, stature
    Boyum balacadır.
    I'm short.
    (literally, “My stature is little.”)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


CebuanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English boy.

NounEdit

boy

  1. houseboy, errand boy

SynonymsEdit


ChibchaEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

boy

  1. Alternative form of boi

ReferencesEdit

  • Gómez Aldana D. F., Análisis morfológico del Vocabulario 158 de la Biblioteca Nacional de Colombia. Grupo de Investigación Muysccubun. 2013.

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English boy.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

boy m (plural boys, diminutive boytje n)

  1. (historical, now offensive) a male domestic servant, especially one with a darker skin in a colony
  2. (informal) boy, young man
    Ik vind die Roy echt een rare boy.I think this Roy is really a strange young man.

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English boy.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

boy m (plural boys)

  1. (now historical, offensive) boy (non-white male servant)
    • 1930, André Malraux, La Voie royale:
      Claude allait l'ouvrir mais le ton sur lequel le délégué appelait son boy lui fit lever la tête : l'auto attendait, bleue sous l'ampoule de la porte; le boy, qui s'était écarté – en voyant arriver le délégué sans doute – se rapprochait, hésitant.

Further readingEdit


HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English boy.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

boy (plural boyok)

  1. young male servant, low-position assistant
    1. bellboy (in a hotel)
      Synonym: londiner
    2. office boy, errand boy, deliveryman
      Synonyms: kifutófiú, kézbesítő
  2. (dated) a male ballet dancer

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative boy boyok
accusative boyt boyokat
dative boynak boyoknak
instrumental boyjal boyokkal
causal-final boyért boyokért
translative boyjá boyokká
terminative boyig boyokig
essive-formal boyként boyokként
essive-modal
inessive boyban boyokban
superessive boyon boyokon
adessive boynál boyoknál
illative boyba boyokba
sublative boyra boyokra
allative boyhoz boyokhoz
elative boyból boyokból
delative boyról boyokról
ablative boytól boyoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
boyé boyoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
boyéi boyokéi
Possessive forms of boy
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. boyom boyaim
2nd person sing. boyod boyaid
3rd person sing. boya boyai
1st person plural boyunk boyaink
2nd person plural boyotok boyaitok
3rd person plural boyuk boyaik

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

  • boy in Ittzés, Nóra (ed.). A magyar nyelv nagyszótára (’A Comprehensive Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 2006–2031 (work in progress; published A–ez as of 2021)

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English boy.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

boy m (plural boys)

  1. a male ballet dancer
  2. a bellboy (in a hotel)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ boy in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Further readingEdit

  • boy in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

LadinoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Turkish boy (stature, size).

NounEdit

boy m (Latin spelling)

  1. size
  2. age

PortugueseEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Shortening of office boy, from English office boy.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

boy m (plural boys)

  1. office boy
  2. (Brazil, slang) a young, upper-class male
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

boy m (plural boys)

  1. Obsolete spelling of boi



SpanishEdit

NounEdit

boy m (plural boyes)

  1. male stripper

Further readingEdit


Sranan TongoEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • boi (official spelling)

EtymologyEdit

From English boy.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

boy

  1. (unofficial spelling) boy

TurkishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Turkic *bod. See archaic bodur (stout, short).

NounEdit

boy (definite accusative boyu, plural boylar)

  1. stature
    Boyun ne kadar?How tall are you? (lit. "How much is your stature?")
  2. size
    küçük boysmall size
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

boy (definite accusative boyu, plural boylar)

  1. tribe, clan
    eski Türk boyları tarihihistory of ancient Turkish clans
DeclensionEdit
Inflection
Nominative boy
Definite accusative boyu
Singular Plural
Nominative boy boylar
Definite accusative boyu boyları
Dative boya boylara
Locative boyda boylarda
Ablative boydan boylardan
Genitive boyun boyların

Etymology 3Edit

From Ottoman Turkish بوی(boy) constructed the same, from Proto-Oghuz, passed into it, Chagatai and Kipchak from Persian بوی(bōy, smell).

NounEdit

boy

  1. (only constructed with otu or tohumu) fenugreek
    Synonym: çemen

ReferencesEdit

  • Clauson, Gerard (1972) An Etymological Dictionary of pre-thirteenth-century Turkish, Oxford: Clarendon Press, page 384b
  • Eren, Hasan (1999), “boy”, in Türk Dilinin Etimolojik Sözlüğü [Etymological Dictionary of the Turkish Language] (in Turkish), Ankara: Bizim Büro Basım Evi, page 59a

WestrobothnianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse bógr (shoulder), from Proto-Germanic *bōguz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰāǵʰus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

boy m (definite singular boyen)

  1. shoulder (of an animal)