See also: Pote, poté, potè, Poté, pote', and potě

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English poten, from Old English potian (to push, thrust, strike, butt, goad), from Proto-Germanic *putōną (to stab, push, poke). Cognate with Dutch poten (to plant), Norwegian Nynorsk pota (to poke). More at put.

VerbEdit

pote (third-person singular simple present potes, present participle poting, simple past and past participle poted)

  1. (obsolete) To push, thrust.
  2. To poke (with a stick etc.).
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


'Are'areEdit

VerbEdit

pote

  1. be full

ReferencesEdit


AfrikaansEdit

NounEdit

pote

  1. plural of poot

BourguignonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin porta.

NounEdit

pote f (plural potes)

  1. door

CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pote m

  1. vocative singular of pot

DanishEdit

NounEdit

pote c (singular definite poten, plural indefinite poter)

  1. paw

InflectionEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

VerbEdit

pote

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of poten

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Clipping of poteau.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pote m or f (plural potes)

  1. (informal) mate (UK), buddy (US)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Trésor de la Langue française informatisée, s.v. "pote" : retrieved 2 June 2013, [1].

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

 
Pote ("pot")

Etymology 1Edit

15th century. Probably borrowed from Old French pot,[1] from Proto-Germanic *puttaz (pot, jar, tub), from Proto-Indo-European *budn- (a kind of vessel). Doublet of pota.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pote m (plural potes)

  1. (cooking) pot
    • 1457, Fernando R. Tato Plaza (ed.), Libro de notas de Álvaro Pérez, notario da Terra de Rianxo e Postmarcos. Santiago: Concello da Cultura Galega, page 182:
      Gomes de Sespooõ diso que nõ sabía máis, saluo que posera en súa casa Martj́n de Dorrõ hũu pote e que despoys fora por el e o leuara
      Gomez of Cespón said that he know nothing, except that Martin of Dorrón left a pot in his house, but that later he came for it and took it away
  2. (cooking) a three feet iron container with lid
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Ultimately from Proto-Germanic *pūto (swollen). Compare English pout.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pote m (plural potes)

  1. bump or swelling in the head caused by a injury
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • pote” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • pote” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • pote” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • pote” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • pote” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Haitian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French apporter (bring).

VerbEdit

pote

  1. bring

InterlinguaEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

pote

  1. present of poter
  2. imperative of poter

ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

pote

  1. Archaic form of può, third-person singular present indicative of potere

LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

pōte

  1. vocative masculine singular of pōtus

ReferencesEdit

  • pote in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • pote in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

MadureseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *(ma-)putiq.

AdjectiveEdit

pote

  1. white (bright and colourless)

NounEdit

pote

  1. white (colour)

Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unknown.

NounEdit

pôte m or f

  1. paw, claw
    Synonym: voet

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit

  • Dutch: poot
  • Limburgish: poeat

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch pote, from Old Dutch *pota, related to Middle Low German pōte and Middle French pote (< Germanic) More at English paw.

NounEdit

pote (plural potes)

  1. An animal's paw's fur or the animal's paw itself.
    • 1398, James Hamilton Wylie, “Appendix A: Duchy of Lancaster Records”, in History of England under Henry the Fourth[2], volume 4, London: Longmans, Green, and Co., published 1898, page 173:
      Fur Potes de Calabr'.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 1420, City of London (England). Corporation, Calendar of Plea and Memoranda Rolls Preserved Among the Archives of the Corporation of the City of London at the Guild-hall[3], volume 1413-1437, The University Press, published 1943, page 75:
      One gown of blue colour furred with potes of calabre, 28
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 1481, William Carton, “68: Godfrey is wounded by a Bear.”, in Mary Noyes Colvin, PhD., editor, Godeffroy of Boloyne; or, The siege and conqueste of Jerusalem[4], London: Published for the Early English Text Society by Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co., translation of original by William of Tyre, published 1893, page 113:
      [] the beeste [] embraced hym with his potes, or feet to fore, []
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 1497, “Will of R. Burton”, in Susan Flood, editor, St. Albans Wills 1471-1500[5], Hertfordshire Record Society, published 1993, page 141:
      My wife's blewe gowne engrayned furred with powtes.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

pote

  1. Alternative form of pot

AnagramsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

pote m (definite singular poten, indefinite plural poter, definite plural potene)

  1. paw

PortugueseEdit

 
pote

EtymologyEdit

From French pot (pot), from Middle French pot, from Old French pot (pot), from Vulgar Latin pottum, pottus (pot, jar), from Proto-Germanic *puttaz (pot, jar, tub), from Proto-Indo-European *budn- (a kind of vessel).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pote m (plural potes)

  1. pot (container)
  2. tupperware (i.e. any container with a lid)

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Catalan pot (container), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *puttaz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pote m (plural potes)

  1. pot
  2. stew

SwahiliEdit

AdjectiveEdit

pote

  1. Pa class inflected form of -ote.

AdverbEdit

pote

  1. everywhere

TarantinoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French poche

NounEdit

pote

  1. pocket