practical

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From practic +‎ -al.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɹæktɪkəl/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: prac‧ti‧cal

AdjectiveEdit

practical (comparative more practical, superlative most practical)

  1. Relating to, or based on, practice or action rather than theory or hypothesis.
    Jack didn't get an engineering degree, but has practical knowledge of metalworking.
    Modern engineering applies science to practical problems.
  2. Being likely to be effective and applicable to a real situation; able to be put to use
    Jack's knowledge has the practical benefit of giving us useful prototype parts.
  3. Of a person, having skills or knowledge that are practical
    All in all, Jack's a very practical chap.
  4. (theater, not comparable) Of a prop: having some degree of functionality, rather than being a mere imitation.
  5. (film) Light fixtures used for set lighting and seen in the frame of a shot as part of the scenery.
    Practical lighting can help sell the illusion that the film is a real situation.

Usage notesEdit

Example of use contrasted with practicable:

  • "While others might agree that it was practical to rewrite the entire section, it was not truly practicable given other considerations."

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

practical (plural practicals)

  1. (Britain) A part of an exam or series of exams in which the candidate has to demonstrate their practical ability
  2. (theater) A prop that has some degree of functionality, rather than being a mere imitation.
  3. (film) A light fixture used for set lighting and seen in the frame of a shot as part of the scenery.

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit