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See also: prætor

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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Anglo-Norman pretour, pretore, the Middle French preteur (from the Old French pretor; compare the Modern French préteur), and their etymon, the Classical Latin praetor (leader”, “commander”, “magistrate); the Latin praetor being contracted from *praeitor (one who goes before), from praeeō (I go before), from prae (before) + (I go); compare the Italian pretore, the Portuguese pretor, and the Spanish pretor.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

praetor (plural praetors or praetores)

  1. (historical) The title designating a Roman administrative official whose role changed over time:
    1. (originally) A consul in command of the army.
    2. (after 366 BC) An annually-elected curule magistrate, subordinate to the consuls in provincial administration, and who performed some of their duties; numbering initially only one, later two (either of the praetor urbānus (urban praetor) or the praetor peregrīnus (peregrine praetor)), and eventually eighteen.
  2. (by extension) A high civic or administrative official, especially a chief magistrate or mayor. Sometimes used as a title.
  3. (historical, translating Italian "pretore") The title of the chief magistrate, the mayor, and/or the podestà in Palermo, in Verona, and in various other parts of 17th- and 18th-century Italy.

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LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

For praeitor, from praeeō (go before, lead).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

praetor m (genitive praetōris); third declension

  1. leader, head, chief, president

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative praetor praetōrēs
Genitive praetōris praetōrum
Dative praetōrī praetōribus
Accusative praetōrem praetōrēs
Ablative praetōre praetōribus
Vocative praetor praetōrēs

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit