precept

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin praeceptum, form of praecipiō (to teach), from Latin prae (pre-) + capiō (take).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɹiːsɛpt/
  • (file)

NounEdit

precept (plural precepts)

  1. A rule or principle, especially one governing personal conduct.
    Precept guides, but example draws.
    • 2006: Theodore Dalrymple, The Gift of Language
      I need hardly point out that Pinker doesn't really believe anything of what he writes, at least if example is stronger evidence of belief than precept.
    • 1891, Hale, Susan, Mexico (The Story of the Nations), volume 27, London: T. Fisher Unwin, page 80:
      He found a people in the extreme of barbarism living in caves, feeding upon the bloody flesh of animals they killed in hunting; he taught them many things, so that by his example, and for generations after he left them by his precepts, they advanced to high civilization.
  2. (law) A written command, especially a demand for payment.
  3. (UK) An order issued by one local authority to another specifying the rate of tax to be charged on its behalf.
    1. A rate or tax set by a precept.
      • The Parish Council is financed by raising a small levy - the precept - on all residential properties within the parish. [1]

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

precept (third-person singular simple present precepts, present participle precepting, simple past and past participle precepted)

  1. (intransitive, chiefly US, medicine) To act as a preceptor; to teach a physician-in-training by supervising their clinical practice.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To teach (something) by precepts.
    • 1603 (date written), [Francis] Bacon, “Valerius Terminus: Of the Interpretation of Nature; with the Annotations of Hermes Stella. Chapter XI. The Chapter Immediately Following the Inventary; Being the 11th in Order, a Part thereof.”, in Robert Stephens, compiler; [John Lockyer], editor, Letters and Remains of the Lord Chancellor Bacon, London: [] W[illiam] Bowyer, published 1734, OCLC 1264954677, page 411:
      [T]he tvvo commended rules by him [Aristotle] ſet down, vvhereby the axioms of Sciences are precepted to be made convertible, and vvhich the latter men have not vvithout elegancy ſurnamed; the one the rule of truth, becauſe it preventeth deceipt; the other the rule of prudence, becauſe it freeth election, are the ſame thing in ſpeculation and affirmation, vvhich vve novv obſerve.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin praeceptum, form of praecipiō (to teach), from prae (pre-) + capiō (take).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

precept f (genitive precepte)

  1. verbal noun of pridchaid
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 10d23
      Mad ar lóg pridcha-sa, .i. ar m’étiuth et mo thoschith, ním·bia fochricc dar hési mo precepte.
      If I preach for pay, that is, for my clothing and my sustenance, I shall not have a reward for my preaching.
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 21c19
      Is oc precept soscéli at·tó.
      I am preaching the gospel.
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 23b7
      Hóre am essamin-se precepte asmo chuimriug, is lia de creitfess.
      Since I am fearless in preaching out of my captivity, the more it is who will believe.
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 28d16
      cách rot·chechladar oc precept
      everyone who will hear you preaching

InflectionEdit

Feminine ā-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative preceptL preceptL, preceupt preceptaH
Vocative preceptL preceptL, preceupt preceptaH
Accusative preceptN, preceupt preceptL, preceupt preceptaH
Genitive precepteH, preceptae preceptL preceptN
Dative preceptL, preceupt preceptaib preceptaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
precept phrecept
or unchanged
precept
pronounced with /b(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French précepte, from Latin praeceptum.

NounEdit

precept n (plural precepte)

  1. precept

DeclensionEdit