preclude

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin praecludo.

PronunciationEdit

  • (US, UK) IPA(key): /pɹɪˈkluːd/, /pɹiːˈkluːd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːd

VerbEdit

preclude (third-person singular simple present precludes, present participle precluding, simple past and past participle precluded)

  1. (transitive) Remove the possibility of; rule out; prevent or exclude; to make impossible.
    It has been raining for days, but that doesn’t preclude the possibility that the skies will clear by this afternoon!
    • 1962 October, G. Freeman Allen, “The New Look in Scotland's Northern Division—II”, in Modern Railways, page 271:
      This is of unusual importance at Perth, compared with other modern yards, because the restricted scope for layout development precluded provision of a separate track as a head shunt at the southern end of the yard site. When such a facility is required, the main line has to be employed.
    • 2013 August 9, Douglas Main, “Israel Outlaws Water Fluoridation”, in livescience[1], retrieved 2013-09-30:
      Israel's decision to ban fluoridation follows a vote to preclude the practice in Portland, Ore., and Wichita, Kan. It was also recently overturned in Hamilton, the fourth most populous city in New Zealand.
    • 2020 June 17, David Clough, “Then and now: trains through Crewe”, in Rail, page 61:
      All the overnight trains were composed of Mk 1 vehicles that had vacuum brakes. This precluded the use of new Class 87s, which only had train air braking equipment, [...].

Related termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

preclude

  1. third-person singular present indicative of precludere