LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Oscan (expected *proque, -que being replaced with Oscan -𐌐𐌄 (-pe)), from Proto-Indo-European *prokʷe, from *pro- + *-kʷe (equivalent to pro + -que).

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

prope (comparative propius, superlative proximē or proxumus)

  1. near, nearby, nigh, close
  2. close in time
  3. almost, nearly
    Synonyms: paene, fermē, ferē, iū̆xtā
  4. better (as an approximation)

PrepositionEdit

prope (+ accusative)

  1. near
    Domus mea prope lacum est.
    My house is near the lake.
  2. (figuratively) towards, about (in time)

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Further readingEdit

  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to be not far away: prope (propius, proxime) abesse
    • to be almost culpable: prope abesse a culpa
  • prope”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • prope”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • prope in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • prope in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette