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See also: Nigh

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English nēah, nēh, from Proto-Germanic *nēhw. Cognate with Dutch na (close, near), German nah (close, near, nearby), Luxembourgish no (nearby, near, close). See also near.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

nigh (comparative nigher or more nigh, superlative nighest or most nigh)

  1. (archaic, poetic) near, close by
    The end is nigh!
  2. Not remote in degree, kindred, circumstances, etc.; closely allied; intimate.
    • Knolles
      nigh kinsmen
    • Bible, Eph. ii. 13
      Ye [] are made nigh by the blood of Christ.

Usage notesEdit

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

nigh (third-person singular simple present nighs, present participle nighing, simple past and past participle nighed)

  1. To draw nigh (to); to approach; to come near.
    night is nighing, death is nighing
    nighing his hour
    a death-nighing moan

QuotationsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

nigh (not comparable)

  1. Almost, nearly.
    Achieving the summit in a single day is, well, nigh impossible.
    • 2017 July 16, Brandon Nowalk, “Chickens and dragons come home to roost on Game Of Thrones (newbies)”, in The Onion AV Club[1]:
      Hell of a surprise in the seventh season premiere of Game Of Thrones. Arya Stark, fresh off a nigh Cersei-level ambush of the Frey household, comes upon a small campfire surrounded by fresh-faced red cloaks.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 12, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      So, after a spell, he decided to make the best of it and shoved us into the front parlor. [] It looked like a tomb and smelt pretty nigh as musty and dead-and-gone.

Usage notesEdit

  • Nigh is sometimes used as a combining form.

QuotationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

PrepositionEdit

nigh

  1. near; close to
    When the Moon is horned ... is it not ever nigh the Sun?

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Irish nigid (he washes), from Proto-Indo-European *neygʷ- (to wash).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

nigh (present analytic níonn, future analytic nífidh, verbal noun , past participle nite)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) wash

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

  • níochán m ((act of) washing; wash, laundry; clothes washed or to be washed)

ReferencesEdit

  • "nigh" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • nigid” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Scottish GaelicEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Irish nigid (he washes), from Proto-Indo-European *neygʷ- (to wash) (compare English nixie (water sprite), Ancient Greek νίζω (nízō)).

VerbEdit

nigh (past nigh, future nighidh, verbal noun nighe, past participle nighte)

  1. wash, cleanse, purify
  2. bathe

InflectionEdit

Tense \ Voice Active Passive
Present a' nighe --
Past nigh nigheadh
Future nighidh nighear
Conditional nigheadh nighteadh

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

nigh f (genitive singular nighe)

  1. daughter
  2. niece

ReferencesEdit

  • Faclair Gàidhlig Dwelly Air Loidhne, Dwelly, Edward (1911), Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic-English Dictionary (10th ed.), Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, ISBN 0 901771 92 9
  • nigid” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.