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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

 
A puffin

From Middle English, apparently from puff + -ing, or perhaps ultimately from Middle Cornish (compare Breton poc'han (puffin)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

puffin (plural puffins)

  1. (now obsolete) The young of the Manx shearwater (Puffinus puffinus), especially eaten as food. [14th–19th c.]
  2. The Atlantic puffin (Fratercula arctica) or, by extension, any of the other various small seabirds of the genera Fratercula and Lunda that are black and white with a brightly-colored beak. [from 17th c.]
    • 1894, Rudyard Kipling, The Jungle Book, The White Seal:
      Naturally the Chickies and the Gooverooskies and the Epatkas–the Burgomaster Gulls and the Kittiwakes and the Puffins, who are always looking for a chance to be rude, took up the cry, and–so Limmershin told me–for nearly five minutes you could not have heard a gun fired on Walrus Islet.
  3. (entomology) Any of various African and Asian pierid butterflies of the genus Appias. Some species of this genus are also known as albatrosses.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English puffin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

puffin m (plural puffins)

  1. shearwater

Further readingEdit