See also: Pute, putè, pūte, putė, and putë

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French pute (nominative singular of putain) – either from Vulgar Latin putta, from Latin puta (girl), or from Latin pūtida (putid, stinking). Cognate with puta in many other Romance languages.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pyt/
  • (file)

NounEdit

pute f (plural putes)

  1. (vulgar) whore, slut (prostitute)
    Aller aux putes
    To get oneself a whore
  2. (vulgar, colloquial) bitch, slut (promiscuous woman)
  3. (vulgar, slang) fucking (used for emphasis)
    pute de con
    fucking asshole

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

pūtē

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of pūteō

Murui HuitotoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Perhaps borrowed from Spanish puño (punch).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈpu.tɛ]
  • Hyphenation: pu‧te

VerbEdit

pute

  1. (transitive) to hit

ReferencesEdit

  • Katarzyna Izabela Wojtylak (2017) A grammar of Murui (Bue): a Witotoan language of Northwest Amazonia.[1], Townsville: James Cook University press (PhD thesis), page 77

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Danish pude (something that puffs up).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pute f or m (definite singular puta or puten, indefinite plural puter, definite plural putene)

  1. a pillow
  2. a cushion

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Danish pude (something that puffs up).

NounEdit

pute f (definite singular puta, indefinite plural puter, definite plural putene)

  1. a pillow
  2. a cushion

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

pute f

  1. nominative singular of putain

Serbo-CroatianEdit

NounEdit

pute m

  1. vocative singular of put

NounEdit

pute (Cyrillic spelling путе)

  1. inflection of puta:
    1. genitive singular
    2. nominative/accusative/vocative plural