See also: ránt

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch ranten, randen (to talk nonsense, rave), of uncertain origin; but apparently related to Middle High German ranzen (to dance, jump around, frolic), German ranzen (to be ardent, be in heat, copulate, mate, ramble, join up).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ɹænt/
  • Rhymes: -ænt
  • (file)

VerbEdit

rant (third-person singular simple present rants, present participle ranting, simple past and past participle ranted)

  1. To speak or shout at length in uncontrollable anger.
  2. To disseminate one's own opinions in a - typically - one-sided, strong manner.
  3. To criticize by ranting.
  4. (dated) To speak extravagantly, as in merriment.
  5. To dance rant steps.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

NounEdit

rant (plural rants)

  1. A criticism done by ranting.
  2. A wild, emotional, and sometimes incoherent articulation.
  3. A type of dance step usually performed in clogs, and particularly (but not exclusively) associated with the English North West Morris tradition. The rant step consists of alternately bringing one foot across and in front of the other and striking the ground, with the other foot making a little hop.

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

rant

  1. simple past of renne
  2. past participle of rane

PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

From German Rand, from Middle High German rant, from Old High German rant.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rant m inan

  1. edge (especially coin edge)
    Synonyms: brzeg, krawędź

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • rant in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • rant in Polish dictionaries at PWN