See also: Tarn and tårn

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse tjǫrn(a small mountain lake without tributaries). Cognate with Norwegian tjern(small forest or mountain lake) and Swedish tjärn(small forest lake)

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs audio files. If you have a microphone, please record some and upload them. (For audio required quickly, visit WT:APR.)
  • Homophone: turn (some US dialects)

NounEdit

 
A tarn in the Lake District

tarn ‎(plural tarns)

  1. (Northern England) A small mountain lake, especially in Northern England.
    • 1839, Edgar Allan Poe, The Fall of the House of Usher, Project Gutenberg (1997), 1,
      It was possible, I reflected, that a mere different arrangement of the particulars of the scene, of the details of the picture, would be sufficient to modify, or perhaps to annihilate its capacity for sorrowful impression; and, acting upon this idea, I reined my horse to the precipitous brink of a black and lurid tarn that lay in unruffled lustre by the dwelling, and gazed down—but with a shudder even more thrilling than before—upon the remodelled and inverted images of the gray sedge, and the ghastly tree-stems, and the vacant and eye-like windows.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • tarn” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

AnagramsEdit