recollect

See also: Recollect

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Medieval Latin recollectus (remembered, composed), from Latin recolligo (gather again, recover)

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) enPR: rĕ-kə-lĕktʹ, IPA(key): /ɹɛkəˈlɛkt/
  • (US) enPR: rĕ-kə-lĕktʹ, IPA(key): /ɹɛkəˈlɛkt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛkt

VerbEdit

recollect (third-person singular simple present recollects, present participle recollecting, simple past and past participle recollected)

  1. To recall; to collect one's thoughts again, especially about past events.
    I remember the concert clearly, but I can't recollect why I had decided to go there.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

re- +‎ collect

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

recollect (third-person singular simple present recollects, present participle recollecting, simple past and past participle recollected)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To collect (things) together again.
  2. To compose oneself.
    • 1697, “(please specify the book number)”, in John Dryden, transl., The Works of Virgil: Containing His Pastorals, Georgics, and Æneis. [], London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], OCLC 403869432:
      The Tyrian queen [] Admir'd his fortunes, more admir'd the man; then re-collected stood.
    • 1847, Newton Mallory Curtis, The Patrol of the Mountain (page 52)
      The Major suddenly recollected himself, and withdrew his hand, and at the same time, threw himself into a chair.

AnagramsEdit