See also: bruch, bŕuch, and břuch

GermanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle High German bruch, from Old High German bruh, from Proto-West Germanic *bruki.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bʁʊx/
  • (file)
  • (file)

NounEdit

Bruch m (strong, genitive Bruches or Bruchs, plural Brüche)

  1. break, breaking, breach, fracture, rupture
  2. (mathematics) fraction
  3. (medicine) fracture (of a bone)
    Synonyms: Knochenbruch, (medical parlance) Fraktur
  4. (medicine) hernia
    sich einen Bruch hebento get a hernia from heavy lifting
    Synonyms: Leistenbruch, Eingeweidebruch, (medical parlance) Hernie
    1. (figuratively) (to) excess, very much
      sich einen Bruch lachento split one's sides (literally, “to laugh oneself a hernia”)
  5. (slang) Short for Einbruch (break-in).
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

 
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From Middle High German bruoch, from Old High German bruoh, from Proto-West Germanic *brōk.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bʁuːx/
  • IPA(key): /bʁʊx/ (now commonly, per etymology 1)

NounEdit

Bruch m or n (strong, genitive Bruches or Bruchs, plural Brüche or Brücher)

  1. (now chiefly in placenames) A wetland; marsh; moist meadow (usually kinds fit for pastoral use, rather than actual bogs or swamps)

Further readingEdit


HunsrikEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Bruch m (plural Brich)

  1. breach
  2. hernia

Further readingEdit


LuxembourgishEdit

Proper nounEdit

Bruch

  1. A small town in central Luxembourg.

Pennsylvania GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare German Bruch, Dutch breuk, English breach.

NounEdit

Bruch m (plural Brich)

  1. quarry
  2. breach
  3. hernia

PlautdietschEdit

NounEdit

Bruch m

  1. rupture
  2. hiatus
  3. hernia