See also: bruch, bŕuch, and břuch

GermanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle High German bruch, from Old High German bruh, from Proto-Germanic *brukiz.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bʁʊx/
  • (file)

NounEdit

Bruch m (genitive Bruches or Bruchs, plural Brüche)

  1. break
  2. fracture, rupture
  3. breach
  4. (mathematics) fraction
  5. (religion) schism
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle High German bruoch, from Old High German bruoh, from Proto-Germanic *brōkaz.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bʁuːx/
  • IPA(key): /bʁʊx/ (now commonly, per etymology 1)

NounEdit

Bruch m or n (genitive Bruches, plural Brüche or Brücher)

  1. (now chiefly in placenames) A wetland; marsh; moist meadow (usually kinds fit for pastoral use, rather than actual bogs or swamps)

HunsrikEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Bruch m (plural Brich)

  1. breach
  2. hernia

Further readingEdit


LuxembourgishEdit

Proper nounEdit

Bruch

  1. A small town in central Luxembourg.

Pennsylvania GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare German Bruch, Dutch breuk, English breach.

NounEdit

Bruch m (plural Brich)

  1. quarry
  2. breach
  3. hernia

PlautdietschEdit

NounEdit

Bruch m

  1. rupture
  2. hiatus
  3. hernia