See also: Sac, SAC, sāc, sắc, sač, sạc, saç, and sặc

TranslingualEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the three first letters of one of the English names for the language, viz. Sac and Fox.

Proper nounEdit

sac

  1. the ISO 639-3 code for the Fox language

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from French sac. Doublet of sack.

NounEdit

sac (plural sacs)

  1. A bag or pouch inside a plant or animal that typically contains a fluid.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Clipping of sacrifice.

VerbEdit

sac (third-person singular simple present sacs, present participle sacking or saccing, simple past and past participle sacked or sacced)

  1. (transitive, informal, games) To sacrifice.
    Kasparov sacked his queen early on in the game to gain a positional advantage against Kramnik.
    I kept saccing monsters at the altar until I was rewarded with a new weapon.

NounEdit

sac (plural sacs)

  1. (transitive, informal, games) A sacrifice.
    Kasparov's queen sac early in the game gained him a positional advantage against Kramnik.

Etymology 3Edit

See sake, soc.

NounEdit

sac

  1. (Britain, law, obsolete) The privilege, formerly enjoyed by the lord of a manor, of holding courts, trying causes, and imposing fines.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Cowell to this entry?)

AnagramsEdit


AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin saccus. Compare Romanian sac.

NounEdit

sac m (plural sats) or n (plural sacuri)

  1. sack, bag

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


AzerbaijaniEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Turkic *siāč.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [sɑd͡ʒ], [sɑd͡z]

NounEdit

sac (definite accusative sacı, plural saclar)

  1. an iron disk on which thin bread cakes are baked

DeclensionEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin saccus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sac m (plural sacs)

  1. sack, bag
  2. sackcloth, smock (rough garment of coarse cloth)
  3. sack, pillage
  4. (obsolete) rectum

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French sac, from Latin saccus, from Ancient Greek σάκκος (sákkos, sack, bag; sackcloth), ultimately from Semitic.

NounEdit

sac m (plural sacs)

  1. bag, sack
  2. (dated slang) ten French francs
    Coordinate term: brique

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Haitian Creole: sak
  • English: sac
  • Moroccan Arabic: صاك
  • Persian: ساک(sâk)

Etymology 2Edit

Old Norse saka (compare English ransack).

NounEdit

sac m (plural sacs)

  1. plunder, loot

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin saccus.

NounEdit

sac m (plural sacs)

  1. sack, bag

Related termsEdit


Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch sac, from late Proto-Germanic *sakkuz, borrowed from Latin saccus.

NounEdit

sac m

  1. sack

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • sac”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “sac”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN

Northern KurdishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Ottoman Turkish ساج(sac, sheet iron), compare Turkish sac (sheet metal, baking plate).

NounEdit

sac ?

  1. baking pan

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin saccus.

NounEdit

sac m (oblique plural sas, nominative singular sas, nominative plural sac)

  1. bag; sack

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • French: sac
    • Haitian Creole: sak
    • English: sac
    • Moroccan Arabic: صاك
    • Persian: ساک(sâk)

RomagnolEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin saccum (bag), from Latin saccus (bag).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sac m (plural sëc)

  1. bag
    Côrsi int i sëc.
    He ran in the bags.

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin saccus, from Ancient Greek σάκκος (sákkos, sack, bag; sackcloth), ultimately of Semitic origin.

NounEdit

sac m (plural saci)

  1. sack, bag

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit


SomaliEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Cushitic *ʃaac-. Compare Afar saga.

NounEdit

sac m

  1. cow

TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ottoman Turkish ساج(sac, sheet iron), from Proto-Turkic *siāč (white copper, tin, pan). Cognate with Chuvash шӑвӑҫ (šăvăś, tin, tin-plate), Karakhanid ساجْ(sāč, pan).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sac (definite accusative sacı, plural saclar)

  1. a tin metal baking plate
  2. sheet metal
  3. tin, tin plate

DeclensionEdit

Inflection
Nominative sac
Definite accusative sacı
Singular Plural
Nominative sac saclar
Definite accusative sacı sacları
Dative saca saclara
Locative sacda saclarda
Ablative sacdan saclardan
Genitive sacın sacların
Possessive forms
Nominative
Singular Plural
1st singular sacım saclarım
2nd singular sacın sacların
3rd singular sacı sacları
1st plural sacımız saclarımız
2nd plural sacınız saclarınız
3rd plural sacları sacları
Definite accusative
Singular Plural
1st singular sacımı saclarımı
2nd singular sacını saclarını
3rd singular sacını saclarını
1st plural sacımızı saclarımızı
2nd plural sacınızı saclarınızı
3rd plural saclarını saclarını
Dative
Singular Plural
1st singular sacıma saclarıma
2nd singular sacına saclarına
3rd singular sacına saclarına
1st plural sacımıza saclarımıza
2nd plural sacınıza saclarınıza
3rd plural saclarına saclarına
Locative
Singular Plural
1st singular sacımda saclarımda
2nd singular sacında saclarında
3rd singular sacında saclarında
1st plural sacımızda saclarımızda
2nd plural sacınızda saclarınızda
3rd plural saclarında saclarında
Ablative
Singular Plural
1st singular sacımdan saclarımdan
2nd singular sacından saclarından
3rd singular sacından saclarından
1st plural sacımızdan saclarımızdan
2nd plural sacınızdan saclarınızdan
3rd plural saclarından saclarından
Genitive
Singular Plural
1st singular sacımın saclarımın
2nd singular sacının saclarının
3rd singular sacının saclarının
1st plural sacımızın saclarımızın
2nd plural sacınızın saclarınızın
3rd plural saclarının saclarının