safeguard

See also: safe-guard

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English savegard, from Middle French sauvegarde, from Old French salve garde, sauve garde, reconstructed as safe +‎ guard.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈseɪfɡɑː(ɹ)d/
  • (file)

NounEdit

safeguard (plural safeguards)

  1. Something that serves as a guard or protection; a defense.
    Getting a flu shot is a good safeguard against illness.
  2. One who, or that which, defends or protects; defence; protection.
  3. A safe-conduct or passport, especially in time of war.
  4. (obsolete) The monitor lizard.
    • 1844, The Animal Kingdom
      The same idea is entertained of the Safeguard in America, as of the Monitor in Africa, and other parts of the Old World, []

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

safeguard (third-person singular simple present safeguards, present participle safeguarding, simple past and past participle safeguarded)

  1. To protect, to keep safe.
    She kept a savings to safeguard against debt and emergencies.
    • 2020 November 18, “Network News: London 'bailout' achieved with just minutes to spare”, in Rail, page 10:
      "[...] Crossrail 2 is mothballed. It is safeguarded, it is absolutely not cancelled."
  2. To escort safely.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit