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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin scālāris, adjectival form from scāla (a flight of steps, stairs, staircase, ladder, scale), for *scadla, from scandere (to climb); compare scale.

The use of the term “scalar” in mathematics was introduced by William Rowan Hamilton when he introduced the quaternion product.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

scalar (not comparable)

  1. (mathematics) Having magnitude but not direction
  2. (computer science) Consisting of a single value (e.g. integer or string) rather than multiple values (e.g. array)
  3. Of, or relating to scale
  4. (music) Of or pertaining to a musical scale.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

NounEdit

scalar (plural scalars)

  1. (mathematics) A quantity that has magnitude but not direction; compare vector
  2. (electronics) An amplifier whose output is a constant multiple of its input

See alsoEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈskaː.lɑr/
  • Hyphenation: sca‧lar

NounEdit

scalar m (plural scalars or scalaren)

  1. scalar (quantity with only magnitude)

Related termsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French scalaire, German Scalar, Latin scalaris.

AdjectiveEdit

scalar

  1. scalar

NounEdit

scalar n (plural scalare)

  1. scalar