rascal

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Recorded since c.1330, as Middle English rascaile ‎(people of the lowest class, rabble of an army), derived from 12th century Old French rascaille ‎(outcast, rabble) (modern French racaille), perhaps from rasque ‎(mud, filth, scab, dregs), from Vulgar Latin *rasicare ‎(to scrape). The singular form is first attested in 1461; the present extended sense of "low, dishonest person" is from early 1586.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rascal ‎(plural rascals)

  1. A dishonest person; a rogue; a scoundrel; a trickster.
  2. A cheeky person or creature; a troublemaker.
    That little rascal bit me!
    If you have deer in the area, you may have to put a fence around your garden to keep the rascals out.
  3. A member of a criminal gang in Papua New Guinea.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

rascal ‎(comparative more rascal, superlative most rascal)

  1. (archaic) Low; lowly, part of or belonging to the common rabble.

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit

Read in another language