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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English scowlen, scoulen, skoulen (also as Middle English schoulen), probably of North Germanic origin. Compare Danish skule (to scowl), Norwegian skule (to scowl).

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: skoul, IPA(key): /skaʊl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aʊl

NounEdit

scowl (plural scowls)

  1. The wrinkling of the brows or face in frowning; the expression of displeasure, sullenness, or discontent in the countenance; an angry frown.
  2. (by extension) Gloom; dark or threatening aspect.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

scowl (third-person singular simple present scowls, present participle scowling, simple past and past participle scowled)

  1. (intransitive) To wrinkle the brows, as in frowning or displeasure; to put on a frowning look; to look sour, sullen, severe, or angry.
    • Spenser
      She scowled and frowned with froward countenance.
  2. (intransitive, by extension) To look gloomy, dark, or threatening; to lower.
    • Thomson
      The scowling heavens.
  3. (transitive) To look at or repel with a scowl or a frown.
    to scowl a rival into submission
  4. (transitive) To express by a scowl.
    to scowl defiance
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

scowl (uncountable)

  1. (Britain, dialectal, obsolete) Old workings of iron ore.

AnagramsEdit