sensate

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English sensat, from Late Latin sensatus (able to sense), from sensus (sense).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɛn.seɪt/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

sensate (comparative more sensate, superlative most sensate)

  1. Perceived by one or more of the senses.
  2. Having the ability to sense things physically.
  3. Felt or apprehended through a sense, or the senses.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Baxter to this entry?)

VerbEdit

sensate (third-person singular simple present sensates, present participle sensating, simple past and past participle sensated)

  1. (transitive) To feel or apprehend by means of the senses; to perceive.
    to sensate light, or an odour
    • R. Hooke
      As those of the one are sensated by the ear, so those of the other are by the eye.

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sensate

  1. feminine plural of sensato

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From sēnsātus (sensible, intelligent) +‎

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

sensātē (not comparable)

  1. intelligently, sensibly

Etymology 2Edit

AdjectiveEdit

sēnsāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of sēnsātus

ReferencesEdit