See also: Serge and sergé

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from French serge, replacing an older borrowing from Middle French sarge, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *sarica, from Latin sērica (silk garments).

NounEdit

serge (countable and uncountable, plural serges)

 
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  1. (textiles) A type of worsted cloth.
    • 1993, John Banville, Ghosts:
      What I noticed most strongly was his smell, of hair oil and serge and cigarette smoke, and something else, something intimate and sour and wholly, shockingly other.
  2. (by metonymy) A garment made of this fabric.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

serge (third-person singular simple present serges, present participle serging, simple past and past participle serged)

  1. (sewing) To overlock.

Etymology 2Edit

From French cierge.

NounEdit

serge (plural serges)

  1. A large wax candle used in some church ceremonies.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French sarge, from Old French sarge, from Vulgar Latin *sarica, from Latin sērica, ultimately from the Ancient Greek σηρῐκός (sērikós, silken).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /sɛʁʒ/
  • (file)

NounEdit

serge f (plural serges)

  1. twill, serge

DescendantsEdit

  • English: serge

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French cerche (search).

NounEdit

serge

  1. Alternative form of serche (search)

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French cerche (edge, margin).

NounEdit

serge

  1. Alternative form of serche (cut rock)

Etymology 3Edit

From Anglo-Norman sercher.

VerbEdit

serge

  1. Alternative form of serchen (to search)

Etymology 4Edit

From Old French cierge, cerge, cirge, from Latin cereus (waxy).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɛrdʒ(ə)/, /ˈsirdʒ(ə)/

NounEdit

serge (plural serges)

  1. cierge (candle used in ceremony)

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit