serrate

EnglishEdit

 
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The serrated edges of tiger shark teeth
 
A hunting knife with a serrated back edge
 
Serrated leaves of the stinging nettle, Urtica dioica

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin serrātus, past participle of serrō.

PronunciationEdit

  • (adjective) IPA(key): /ˈsɛɹeɪt/, /ˈsɛɹət/
  • (verb) IPA(key): /səˈɹeɪt/

AdjectiveEdit

serrate (comparative more serrate, superlative most serrate)

  1. Having tooth-like projections on one side, as in a saw.
    Many click beetles have serrate antennae.
  2. (botany) (leaves) Having tooth-like projections pointed away from the petiole.

Usage notesEdit

Serrate is used in some scientific communities; for common usage, serrated is typically the more appropriate term.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

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TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

serrate (third-person singular simple present serrates, present participle serrating, simple past and past participle serrated)

  1. To make serrate.
  2. To cut or divide in a jagged way.
    • 2000, Bill Oddie, Gripping Yarns, page 59:
      I [...] set off to check the other sheltered valleys that serrate the east side of Lundy.

TranslationsEdit

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ItalianEdit

NounEdit

serrate f

  1. plural of serrata

VerbEdit

serrate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of serrare
  2. second-person plural imperative of serrare
  3. feminine plural of serrato

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

serrāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of serrō