EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English shryven, shriven, schrifen, from Old English sċrīfan (1. to decree, pass judgement, prescribe, 2. (of a priest) to prescribe penance or absolution), from late Proto-Germanic *skrībaną, a borrowing from Latin scrībō (write). Compare West Frisian skriuwe (to write), Low German schrieven (to write), Dutch schrijven (to write), German schreiben (to write), Danish skrive (to write), Swedish skriva (to write), Icelandic skrifa (to write). More at scribe.

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: shrīv, IPA(key): /ˈʃɹaɪv/
  • Rhymes: -aɪv
    • (file)

VerbEdit

shrive (third-person singular simple present shrives, present participle shriving, simple past shrived or shrove, past participle shrived or shriven)

  1. (religion, transitive and intransitive) To hear or receive a confession (of sins etc.)
  2. (religion, transitive) To prescribe penance or absolution.
  3. (religion, intransitive or reflexive) To confess, and receive absolution.
    • (Can we date this quote by traditional Irish song and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?), The Croppy Boy
      'Twas a good thought, boy, to come here and shrive.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

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Middle EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

shrive

  1. Alternative form of shryven