See also: Coy and cố ý

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French coi, earlier quei (quiet, still), from Latin quietus (resting, at rest). Doublet of quiet.

AdjectiveEdit

coy (comparative coyer, superlative coyest)

  1. (dated) Bashful, shy, retiring.
  2. (archaic) Quiet, reserved, modest.
  3. Reluctant to give details about something sensitive; notably prudish.
  4. Pretending shyness or modesty, especially in an insincere or flirtatious way.
  5. Soft, gentle, hesitating.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

coy (third-person singular simple present coys, present participle coying, simple past and past participle coyed)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To caress, pet; to coax, entice.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To calm or soothe.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To allure; to decoy.
    • 1635, Edward Rainbowe, Labour Forbidden, and Commanded. A Sermon Preached at St. Pauls[sic] Church, September 28. 1634., London: Nicholas Vavasour, page 29:
      For now there are ſprung up a wiſer generation in this kind, who have the Art to coy the fonder ſort into their nets

Etymology 2Edit

Compare decoy.

NounEdit

coy (plural coys)

  1. A trap from which waterfowl may be hunted.

Etymology 3Edit

Abbreviation of company.

NounEdit

coy (plural coys)

  1. (military) A company

ReferencesEdit

  • coy” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020. [1]

AnagramsEdit


HuaveEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

coy

  1. rheumatism

ReferencesEdit

  • Stairs Kreger, Glenn Albert; Scharfe de Stairs, Emily Florence; Olvaries Oviedo, Proceso; Ponce Villanueva, Tereso; Comonfort Llave, Lorenzo (1981) Diccionario huave de San Mateo del Mar (Serie de vocabularios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 24)‎[2] (in Spanish), México, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, pages 88, 205, 268

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

coy

  1. rabbit

ReferencesEdit

  • Stairs Kreger, Glenn Albert; Scharfe de Stairs, Emily Florence; Olvaries Oviedo, Proceso; Ponce Villanueva, Tereso; Comonfort Llave, Lorenzo (1981) Diccionario huave de San Mateo del Mar (Serie de vocabularios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 24)‎[3] (in Spanish), México, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, pages 88, 212, 416

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

coy

  1. short tail, stub

ReferencesEdit

  • Stairs Kreger, Glenn Albert; Scharfe de Stairs, Emily Florence; Olvaries Oviedo, Proceso; Ponce Villanueva, Tereso; Comonfort Llave, Lorenzo (1981) Diccionario huave de San Mateo del Mar (Serie de vocabularios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 24)‎[4] (in Spanish), México, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, pages 88, 211, 265

Middle FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French coi, from Vulgar Latin quetus, from Latin quietus.

AdjectiveEdit

coy m (feminine singular coye, masculine plural coys, feminine plural coyes)

  1. (of a person) calm; composed

DescendantsEdit

  • French: coi

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch kooi (bunk). Doublet of gavia and cávea.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

coy m (plural coyes or cois)

  1. (nautical) a type of hammock made of sailcloth used as a makeshift bunk