simulate

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Inherited from Middle English symulat (feigned, similar), from Latin simulātus, past participle of simulō (make like, imitate, copy, represent, feign), from similis (like). See similar.

PronunciationEdit

  • (verb)
    • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈsɪm.jʊˌleɪt/
      • (file)
    • (US) IPA(key): /ˈsɪm.jəˌleɪt/
  • (adjective)

VerbEdit

simulate (third-person singular simple present simulates, present participle simulating, simple past and past participle simulated)

  1. To model, replicate, duplicate the behavior, appearance or properties of.
    We will use a smoke machine to simulate the fog you will actually encounter.

SynonymsEdit

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TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AdjectiveEdit

simulate (comparative more simulate, superlative most simulate)

  1. (obsolete) Feigned; pretended.
    • 1545, John Bale, The Image of Both Churches
      under simulate religion

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

AdjectiveEdit

simulate

  1. feminine plural of simulato

ParticipleEdit

simulate f pl

  1. feminine plural of simulato

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

simulate

  1. inflection of simulare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

simulāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of simulō

ReferencesEdit

  • simulate”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers