See also: Singer

EnglishEdit

 
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Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English synger, syngere, singere, singare, equivalent to sing +‎ -er. Cognate with Scots singar, Saterland Frisian Sjunger, West Frisian sjonger, German Low German Singer. Compare also Old English sangere, Dutch zanger, German Low German Sänger, German Sänger (singer), Danish sanger, Swedish sångare, Icelandic söngvari.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

singer (plural singers)

  1. A person who sings, often professionally.
  2. (square dance) dance figure with a fixed structure, sung by a caller, or a piece of music with that structure.
SynonymsEdit
HyponymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Japanese: シンガー (shingā)
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2Edit

From singe +‎ -er.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

singer (plural singers)

  1. A person who, or device which, singes.
  2. A machine for singeing cloth.
TranslationsEdit

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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

In at least the ape sense, from singe (monkey).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

singer

  1. to ape
    • 2019, Alain Damasio, chapter 3, in Les furtifs [The Stealthies], La Volte, →ISBN:
      [] nous privilégions tous les deux les « interfaces humaines », comme ils disent, même quand elles singent, comme ici, une mauvaise IA.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
  2. to sprinkle with flour

ConjugationEdit

This is a regular -er verb, but the stem is written singe- before endings that begin with -a- or -o- (to indicate that the -g- is a "soft" /ʒ/ and not a "hard" /ɡ/). This spelling-change occurs in all verbs in -ger, such as neiger and manger.

Further readingEdit

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