See also: re-sign

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Anglo-Norman resigner, Middle French resigner, and its source, Latin resignāre (to unseal, annul, assign, resign), from re- + signāre (to seal, stamp).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɹɪˈzaɪn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪn

VerbEdit

resign (third-person singular simple present resigns, present participle resigning, simple past and past participle resigned)

  1. (transitive) To give up; to relinquish ownership of. [from 14th c.]
  2. (transitive) To hand over (something to someone), place into the care or control of another.
  3. (transitive or intransitive) To quit (a job or position). [from 14th c.]
    I am resigning in protest of the unfair treatment of our employees.
    He resigned the crown to follow his heart.
  4. (transitive) To submit passively; to give up as hopeless or inevitable. [from 15th c.]
    He had no choice but to resign the game and let his opponent become the champion.
    • 1996, Robin Buss, The Count of Monte Cristo, translation of, Alexandre Dumas, Le Comte de Monte-Cristo, 2003 Penguin edition, →ISBN, page 394 [1]:
      Here is a man who was resigned to his fate, who was walking to the scaffold and about to die like a coward, that's true, but at least he was about to die without resisting and without recrimination. Do you know what gave him that much strength? Do you know what consoled him? Do you know what resigned him to his fate?
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

re- +‎ sign

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

resign (third-person singular simple present resigns, present participle resigning, simple past and past participle resigned)

  1. (proscribed) Alternative spelling of re-sign
    • 2020, Kevin McCarthy, mutt 2.0.0 released, mutt-announce mailing list, November 7 2020
      Lastly, a note that I have resigned my GPG key to extend the expiration date.

Usage notesEdit

The spelling without the hyphen results in a heteronym and is usually avoided.

AnagramsEdit