See also: Cantor

EnglishEdit

 
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A Cantor singing

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin cantor, agent noun from perfect passive participle cantus, from verb canere (to sing) + agent suffix -or. Doublet of chanter.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkæntɔː(ɹ)/, /ˈkæntə(ɹ)/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æntə(ɹ)

NounEdit

cantor (plural cantors)

  1. singer, especially someone who takes a special role of singing or song leading at a ceremony
    The cantor's place in church is on the right of the choir.
  2. A prayer leader in a Jewish service; a hazzan

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cantor (male singer), cantōrem.

NounEdit

cantor m (plural cantores)

  1. singer (person who sings)

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cantor.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cantor m (plural cantors, feminine cantora)

  1. singer (person who sings)
    Synonym: cantaire

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From canō (I sing) +‎ -tor.

NounEdit

cantor m (genitive cantōris, feminine cantrīx); third declension

  1. singer (male)
  2. player (male)
DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cantor cantōrēs
Genitive cantōris cantōrum
Dative cantōrī cantōribus
Accusative cantōrem cantōrēs
Ablative cantōre cantōribus
Vocative cantor cantōrēs
Coordinate termsEdit
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Inflected form of cantō (I sing).

VerbEdit

cantor

  1. first-person singular present passive indicative of cantō

ReferencesEdit

  • cantor”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cantor”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cantor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cantōrem (male singer).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cantor m (plural cantores, feminine cantora, feminine plural cantoras)

  1. singer (person who sings)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cantor.

NounEdit

cantor m (plural cantori)

  1. cantor

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cantōrem.

AdjectiveEdit

cantor (feminine cantora, masculine plural cantores, feminine plural cantoras)

  1. singing

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

cantor m (plural cantores, feminine cantora, feminine plural cantoras)

  1. singer

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


VenetianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cantor, cantōrem.

NounEdit

cantor m (plural cantori) or cantor m (plural canturi)

  1. singer, chorister

WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Welsh kantor, from Latin cantor.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cantor f (plural cantorion or cantoriaid, feminine cantores)

  1. singer
    Synonym: canwr

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
cantor gantor nghantor chantor
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “cantor”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

WestrobothnianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Swedish mjölkkantor (milk cabinet), obsolete form of mjölkkontor, from obsolete kantor corresponding to modern kontor (office; building or room), from Middle Low German kantôr, kontôr, komtôr, komptor (commercial branch; writing room; counting desk/table), from Middle Dutch cantoor, contoor, contoir, comptoir, from Middle French contoir, comptoir, from conter, compter (to count) + -oir (instrument sufffix) calquing earlier Medieval Latin computōrium.

NounEdit

cāntōr n (definite singular cāntōrä̆, definite plural cāntōră)

  1. Alternative spelling of kanntor