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See also: Cantor

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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A Cantor singing

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin cantor, agent noun from perfect passive participle cantus, from verb canere (to sing) + agent suffix -or.

NounEdit

cantor (plural cantors)

  1. singer, especially someone who takes a special role of singing or song leading at a ceremony
    The cantor's place in church is on the right of the choir

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cantor (male singer), cantōrem.

NounEdit

cantor m (plural cantores)

  1. singer (person who sings)

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From canō (I sing) +‎ -tor.

NounEdit

cantor m (genitive cantōris); third declension

  1. singer (male)
  2. player
InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative cantor cantōrēs
genitive cantōris cantōrum
dative cantōrī cantōribus
accusative cantōrem cantōrēs
ablative cantōre cantōribus
vocative cantor cantōrēs
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Inflected form of cantō (I sing).

VerbEdit

cantor

  1. first-person singular present passive indicative of cantō

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cantōrem (male singer).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cantor m (plural cantores, feminine cantora, feminine plural cantoras)

  1. singer (person who sings)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cantor, cantōrem.

AdjectiveEdit

cantor (feminine singular cantora, masculine plural cantores, feminine plural cantoras)

  1. singing

NounEdit

cantor m (plural cantores, feminine cantora)

  1. singer

Related termsEdit


VenetianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cantor, cantōrem.

NounEdit

cantor m (plural cantori) or cantor m (plural canturi)

  1. singer, chorister