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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish skål.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /skɒl/
  • (file)

InterjectionEdit

skol

  1. (originally and chiefly in Scotland) A drinking-toast; cheers.
    • 1990, Alasdair Gray, ‘A Free Man with a Pipe’, Canongate 2012 (Every Short Story 1951-2012), page 490:
      Again they notice he has impressed her and again he grows more cheerful, clinking his glass against hers and saying ‘Skol!’

VerbEdit

skol (third-person singular simple present skols, present participle skolling, simple past and past participle skolled)

  1. (Australia, slang, transitive) To down (a drink).
    • 2010, Penelope Green, When in Rome: Chasing la dolce vita
      When diners leave a quarter of a carafe full of house wine we put it above the sink to refill for new orders, but often I catch him skolling the remains of whatever he can get his hands on.
    • 2011, Richard Plant, Life's a Blur
      The Aussie skolled his beer, threw the Kiwi into the fireplace, and shot him.

AnagramsEdit


BretonEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin schola.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

skol f

  1. school

Derived termsEdit


CornishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin schola.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

skol f (plural skolyow)

  1. school

DalmatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

skol f

  1. school

ReferencesEdit

  • 2000, Matteo Giulio Bartoli, Il Dalmatico: Resti di un’antica lingua romanza parlata da Veglia a Ragusa e sua collocazione nella Romània appenino-balcanica, Istituto della Enciclopedia Italiana.

PapiamentuEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch school.

NounEdit

skol

  1. school