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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English slaveren, of Scandinavian origin, akin to or derived from Old Norse slafra (to slaver), probably imitative. Cognate with slabber.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

slaver (third-person singular simple present slavers, present participle slavering, simple past and past participle slavered)

  1. (intransitive) To drool saliva from the mouth; to slobber.
  2. (intransitive) To fawn.
  3. (transitive) To smear with saliva issuing from the mouth.
  4. To be besmeared with saliva.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

slaver (uncountable)

  1. Saliva running from the mouth; drool.
    • Alexander Pope
      Of all mad creatures, if the learned are right, / It is the slaver kills, and not the bite.

Etymology 2Edit

From the verb slave 'enslave, traffic in slaves'

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

slaver (plural slavers)

  1. A person engaged in the slave trade.
  2. A white slaver, who sells prostitutes into illegal 'sex slavery'.
  3. (nautical) A ship used to transport slaves.
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • slaver” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2018.
  • Webster's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin sclavus, whence also slave.

NounEdit

slaver c

  1. Slav

NounEdit

slaver c

  1. plural indefinite of slave

VerbEdit

slaver

  1. present tense of slave

Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

slaver m

  1. indefinite plural of slave

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

slaver

  1. indefinite plural of slav