See also: Mango, mangó, manĝo, and mangō

EnglishEdit

 
mangoes (fruit)
 
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EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese manga, from Malay mangga. First used for the fruit as early as the 1580s and the tree by the 1670s.[1][2] Ultimately from a Dravidian language[3] (reconstructed Proto-Dravidian *maṯ-kāy (unripe mango), a compound of *mā-m (mango tree) + *kāy (unripe fruit)[4]); Oxford English Dictionary says it ultimately stems from Malayalam മാങ്ങ (māṅṅa, unripe mango) (മാവ് (māvŭ, mango tree) + കായ (kāya, unripe fruit)),[2] while the Online Etymology Dictionary points to Tamil மாங்காய் (māṅkāy, unripe mango) (மா (, mango) + காய் (kāy, unripe fruit)).[1] The etymology of the -o ending is not certain.[2]

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈmæŋɡəʊ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈmæŋɡoʊ/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æŋɡəʊ

NounEdit

mango (countable and uncountable, plural mangoes or mangos)

  1. A tropical Asian fruit tree, Mangifera indica.
    • 1980, Bruce Chatwin, The Viceroy of Ouidah, page 146:
      On the hot days, he would lie in the shade of a mango and let little Eugenia clamber over his belly and tug at his beard.
  2. The fruit of the mango tree.
    • 1738, October–November, Hans Sloan, Philosophical Transactions, volume 40, number 450, “VI. his Answer to the Marquis de Caumont's Letter, concerning this Stone”, translated from the Latin by Thomas Stack, Royal Society (1741), page 376:
      And I have one [bezoar] form'd round the Stone of that great Plum, which comes pickled from thence, and is called Mango.
  3. A pickled vegetable or fruit with a spicy stuffing; a vegetable or fruit which has been mangoed.
    • 2004, Elizabeth E. Lea, William Woys Weaver, A Quaker Woman's Cookbook: The Domestic Cookery of Elizabeth Ellicott Lea, page 335:
      In Pennsylvania and western Maryland, mangoes were generally made with green bell peppers.
  4. (US, chiefly southern Midwestern US, dated) A green bell pepper suitable for pickling.
    • 1879, Pennsylvania State Board of Agriculture, Agriculture of Pennsylvania, page 222:
      Mango peppers by the dozen, if owned by the careful housewife, would gladden the appetite or disposition of any epicure or scold.
    • 1896, Ohio State Board of Agriculture, Annual Report, page 154:
      Best mango peppers
    • 1943, August 9, “Mary Adgate”, in Stuffed Mangoes[1], Lima, Ohio, page 5:
      Cut tops from mangoes; remove seeds.
    • 2000, Allan A. Metcalf, How We Talk: American Regional English Today, page 41:
      Finally, although both the South and North Midlands are not known for their tropical climate, that's where mangoes grow. These aren't the tropical fruit, though, but what are elsewhere called green peppers.
  5. A type of muskmelon, Cucumis melo.
  6. Any of various hummingbirds of the genus Anthracothorax.
  7. A yellow-orange color, like that of mango flesh.
    mango:  

HypernymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

mango (third-person singular simple present mangoes, present participle mangoing, simple past and past participle mangoed)

  1. (uncommon) To stuff and pickle (a fruit).
    • 1870, Hannah Mary Peterson, The Young Wife's Cook Book, page 444:
      Although any melon may be used before it is quite ripe, yet there is a particular sort for this purpose, which the gardeners know, and should be mangoed soon after they are gathered.
    • 1989, William Woys Weaver, America eats: forms of edible folk art:
      In an effort to reproduce the pickle, English cooks took to "mangoing" all sorts of substitutes, from cucumbers to unripe peaches. Americans, however, preferred baby musk melons, or, in areas where they did not grow well, bell peppers.
    • 2008, Beverly Ellen Schoonmaker Alfeld, Pickles To Relish, →ISBN, page 66:
      For this cookbook, I made mangoed peppers that were not stuffed with cabbage, but stuffed with green and red tomatoes and onions.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Douglas Harper (2001–2022), “mango”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 mango, n.1”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, June 2021.
  3. ^ mango, n.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–2022.
  4. ^ Krishnamurti, Bhadriraju (2003) The Dravidian Languages (Cambridge Language Surveys), Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, pages 526, 530.

AnagramsEdit


AfarEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from Malay mangga, from Malayalam മാങ്ങ (māṅṅa).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mʌnˈɡo/
  • Hyphenation: man‧go

NounEdit

mangó f 

  1. mango (fruit)
  2. mango (plant)
  3. mango juice

ReferencesEdit

  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[2], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis)

Antillean CreoleEdit

NounEdit

mango

  1. mango

Central NahuatlEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish mango.

NounEdit

mango (inanimate)

  1. (Amecameca) Mango

ChichewaEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mangó 6

  1. mango (fruit)
  2. plural of bango

SynonymsEdit


CornishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English mango, from Portuguese manga, from Malay mangga, from Malayalam മാങ്ങ (māṅṅa).

PronunciationEdit

  • (Revived Middle Cornish) IPA(key): [ˈmaŋɡɔ]
  • (Revived Late Cornish) IPA(key): [ˈmæŋɡɔ]

NounEdit

mango m (plural mangos)

  1. mango

MutationEdit


CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English mango, from Portuguese manga, from Malay mangga, from Tamil மாங்காய் (māṅkāy) from மா (, mango species) + காய் (kāy, unripe fruit).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mango n

  1. mango (the fruit of the mango tree)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • mango in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • mango in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English mango, from Portuguese manga, from Malay mangga, from Tamil மாங்காய் (māṅkāy), from மா (, mango species) + காய் (kāy, unripe fruit).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɑŋ.ɡoː/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: man‧go

NounEdit

mango m (plural mango's, diminutive mangootje n)

  1. (Netherlands, Belgium) mango
    Synonyms: manga, manja
  2. (Netherlands, Belgium) mango tree, Mangifera indica

Derived termsEdit


EsperantoEdit

 
Esperanto Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia eo

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from Malay mangga, from Tamil மாங்காய் (māṅkāy).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mango (accusative singular mangon, plural mangoj, accusative plural mangojn)

  1. mango

Derived termsEdit


FinnishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɑŋːo/, [ˈmɑŋːo̞]
  • Rhymes: -ɑŋːo
  • Syllabification(key): man‧go

Etymology 1Edit

From English mango, from Portuguese manga, from Malay mangga, from Malayalam മാങ്ങ (māṅṅa).

NounEdit

mango

  1. mango (fruit)
DeclensionEdit
Inflection of mango (Kotus type 1/valo, no gradation)
nominative mango mangot
genitive mangon mangojen
partitive mangoa mangoja
illative mangoon mangoihin
singular plural
nominative mango mangot
accusative nom. mango mangot
gen. mangon
genitive mangon mangojen
partitive mangoa mangoja
inessive mangossa mangoissa
elative mangosta mangoista
illative mangoon mangoihin
adessive mangolla mangoilla
ablative mangolta mangoilta
allative mangolle mangoille
essive mangona mangoina
translative mangoksi mangoiksi
instructive mangoin
abessive mangotta mangoitta
comitative mangoineen
Possessive forms of mango (type valo)
possessor singular plural
1st person mangoni mangomme
2nd person mangosi mangonne
3rd person mangonsa

Etymology 2Edit

From French mangue.

NounEdit

mango

  1. (dated) Synonym of kusimanse (common kusimanse, Crossarchus obscurus).
DeclensionEdit
Inflection of mango (Kotus type 1/valo, no gradation)
nominative mango mangot
genitive mangon mangojen
partitive mangoa mangoja
illative mangoon mangoihin
singular plural
nominative mango mangot
accusative nom. mango mangot
gen. mangon
genitive mangon mangojen
partitive mangoa mangoja
inessive mangossa mangoissa
elative mangosta mangoista
illative mangoon mangoihin
adessive mangolla mangoilla
ablative mangolta mangoilta
allative mangolle mangoille
essive mangona mangoina
translative mangoksi mangoiksi
instructive mangoin
abessive mangotta mangoitta
comitative mangoineen
Possessive forms of mango (type valo)
possessor singular plural
1st person mangoni mangomme
2nd person mangosi mangonne
3rd person mangonsa

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese mango (13th century, Alfonso X), from Vulgar Latin *manicus. Cognate with Portuguese mango, Spanish mango, French manche, Italian manico.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mango m (plural mangos)

  1. grip, handgrip, handle
    Synonyms: anga, asa
  2. hilt
    Synonym: puño
  3. handle, shaft
    Synonym: cabo

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

mango

  1. First-person singular (eu) present indicative of mangar

ReferencesEdit

  • mango” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006–2022.
  • mango” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006–2018.
  • mango” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • mango” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • mango” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

HiligaynonEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mangô

  1. (derogatory) Idiot.

AdjectiveEdit

mangô

  1. Stupid, foolish.

Usage notesEdit

  • The word can sound friendly and affectionate between close people.

See alsoEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English mango, from Portuguese manga, from Malay mangga, from Tamil மாங்காய் (māṅkāy) from மா (, mango species) + காய் (kāy, unripe fruit).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mango m (plural manghi)

  1. mango

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From mangonium (displaying of wares), which Buck calls a loan from Ancient Greek μάγγανον (mánganon, charming, means for beguiling).[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mangō m (genitive mangōnis); third declension

  1. dealer, monger (especially of slaves)

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative mangō mangōnēs
Genitive mangōnis mangōnum
Dative mangōnī mangōnibus
Accusative mangōnem mangōnēs
Ablative mangōne mangōnibus
Vocative mangō mangōnēs

ReferencesEdit

  • mango”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mango”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • mango in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • mango in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • mango”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  1. ^ Buck, Carl Darling, A Dictionary of Selected Synonyms in the Principal Indo-European Languages, University of Chicago, 1949, reprinted 1988.

LatvianEdit

 mango on Latvian Wikipedia
 
Mango (1)
 
Mango (2)

EtymologyEdit

Via other European languages, see etymology at English mango.

PronunciationEdit

(file)

NounEdit

mango m (invariable)

  1. tree of the genus Mangifera with aromatic, sweet fruits
    mango ir viens no tropu svarīgākajiem augļu kokiemthe mango is one of the most important tropical fruit trees
  2. mango fruit (the fruit of this tree)
    mango ir tropu koku augļithe mango is a tropical tree fruit
    mēs pasūtām mango sulu ar leduwe ordered mango juice with ice

PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English mango, from Portuguese manga, from Malay mangga, from Tamil மாங்காய் (māṅkāy), from மா (, mango species) + காய் (kāy, unripe fruit).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mango n (indeclinable)

  1. mango (fruit and tree)

Further readingEdit

  • mango in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • mango in Polish dictionaries at PWN

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English mango, from Portuguese manga, from Malay mangga, from Tamil மாங்காய் (māṅkāy), from மா (, mango species) + காய் (kāy, unripe fruit).

NounEdit

mango m (plural mango)

  1. mango

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

 
un mango de espada

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmanɡo/, [ˈmãŋ.ɡo]

Etymology 1Edit

From Vulgar Latin manicus, from Latin manus (hand).

NounEdit

mango m (plural mangos)

  1. handle (part of an object which is held in the hand)
    • 2011, Estándar de milady: barbero profesional, 5th edition, Milady, page 353:
      Sostenga el mango de la navaja entre los dedos anular y meñique, []
      Hold the razor’s handle between your ring finger and little finger, []
Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

 
un mango

Etymology 2Edit

From English mango, from Portuguese manga, from Malay mangga, from Tamil மாங்காய் (māṅkāy) from மா (, mango species) + காய் (kāy, unripe fruit).

NounEdit

mango m (plural mangos)

  1. mango (fruit and tree)
  2. (Argentina, Uruguay, lunfardo, colloquial) cash, dough (money)
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Tetelcingo Nahuatl: mönco

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

mango

  1. first-person singular present indicative of mangar

Further readingEdit


SwahiliEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mango (n class, plural mango)

  1. solid

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese manga, from Malay mangga, from Tamil மாங்காய் (māṅkāy).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mango c

  1. mango

DeclensionEdit

Declension of mango 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative mango mangon mangor, mangoer mangorna, mangoerna
Genitive mangos mangons mangors, mangoers mangornas, mangoernas

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


TernateEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

mango

  1. (stative) to be sharp

ConjugationEdit

Conjugation of mango
Singular Plural
Inclusive Exclusive
1st tomango fomango mimango
2nd nomango nimango
3rd Human m omango imango, yomango
Human f momango
Non-human imango
* m - masculine, f - feminine, - archaic

ReferencesEdit

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001) A descriptive study of the language of Ternate, the northern Moluccas, Indonesia, University of Pittsburgh

WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English mango.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mango m (plural mangos)

  1. mango

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
mango fango unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.