EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From smash +‎ -ing. As a synonym for wonderful, the term first appeared in early 20th-century USA, and possibly derives from the sense of smash used in smash hit and similar terms. Popular folk etymology connects the term to the Irish is maith sin or Scottish Gaelic 's math sin ("that is good"), but this has been described as "improbable",[1] and does not appear in most dictionaries.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

smashing (comparative more smashing, superlative most smashing)

  1. Serving to smash (something).
    The boxer delivered a smashing blow to his opponent's head.
  2. (originally US, now Britain, slightly dated) Wonderful, very good or impressive.
    We had a smashing time at the zoo.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

smashing (plural smashings)

  1. Gerund: The action of the verb to smash.
    Some Greek dance is traditionally accompanied by the smashing of crockery.

VerbEdit

smashing

  1. present participle of smash

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 2004, T. P. Dolan, A Dictionary of Hiberno-English: The Irish Use of English, page 217

AnagramsEdit