See also: math. and maths

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English math, from Old English mǣþ (a mowing, that which is mown, cutting of grass), from Proto-Germanic *mēþą (a mowing), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂meh₁- (to mow); equivalent to mow +‎ -th. Cognate with German Mahd (a mowing, reaping). Related also to Old English mǣd (mead, meadow, pasture). See meadow.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

math (plural maths)

  1. A mowing; what is gathered from mowing.
    Hyponyms: aftermath, foremath, lattermath
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Contraction of mathematics.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

math (countable and uncountable, plural maths)

  1. (uncountable, Canada, US) Clipping of mathematics.
  2. (uncountable, Canada, US) Arithmetic calculations; (see do the math).
    If you do the math, you'll see that it’s not such a bargain.
    $170 a month? That doesn’t sound right. Let me check your math.
  3. (countable, Canada, US) A math course.
    They needed to take two more maths in order to graduate.
    • 2010, Claude Regis Vargo, Beyond My Horizon, →ISBN, page 108:
      Then, I further worked myself into an A+ panic attack with the realization that on top of the algebra, I would have to take three more maths, from a choice of calculus, finite math, statistics, logic, or differential equation.
HyponymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
Further readingEdit

VerbEdit

math (third-person singular simple present maths, present participle mathing, simple past and past participle mathed)

  1. (colloquial, informal) to do mathematical calculations

Etymology 3Edit

Contraction of matha.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

math (plural maths)

  1. (Hinduism, Jainism) Clipping of matha.

AnagramsEdit


Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *matus, commonly understood as a euphemistic derivation from *matis (good), cf. Proto-Germanic *berô (the brown one), Proto-Slavic *medvědь (honey-eater), Latvian lācis (stomper, pounder). A cognate is apparently attested in the Gaulish personal name Matugenos if this means born of a bear, and a possibly related Celtiberian matus of uncertain meaning is also attested.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

math m (genitive matho)[2]

  1. bear

InflectionEdit

Masculine u-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative math mathL mathae
Vocative math mathL mathu
Accusative mathN mathL mathu
Genitive mathoH, mathaH matho, matha mathaeN
Dative mathL mathaib mathaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
math
also mmath after a proclitic
math
pronounced with /ṽ(ʲ)-/
math
also mmath after a proclitic
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009), “*mati-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 259
  2. ^ Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “math”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Scottish GaelicEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish maith, from Proto-Celtic *matis, from Proto-Indo-European *meh₂-. Cognate with Welsh mad, Breton mad, Cornish mas. Compare Irish maith, Manx mie.

AdjectiveEdit

math (genitive singular masculine maith, genitive singular feminine maithe, nominative plural matha, comparative fheàrr)

  1. good
    'S math sin.That's good.
DeclensionEdit
Case Masculine singular Feminine singular Plural
Nominative math mhath matha
Vocative mhaith mhath matha
Genitive mhaith maithe/mhaith matha
Dative mhath mhaith matha
SynonymsEdit
  • deagh (slightly stronger)
Derived termsEdit

AdverbEdit

math

  1. well
    Ciamar a tha thu? Meadhanach math.How are you? Reasonably well.
AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

math m (genitive singular maith)

  1. good
  2. advantage, profit, use, utility
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Irish maithid (remits, excuses; pardons, forgives; remits, abates, withholds; gives up (claim to); renounces), from maith (good).

VerbEdit

math (past mhath, future mathaidh, verbal noun mathadh, past participle mathte)

  1. forgive, excuse, pardon, condone, remit
Alternative formsEdit

ReferencesEdit


WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

A variation on bath (kind, sort). For similar instances of alternation between b and m, see benyw and menyw, beiddio and meiddio, bainc and mainc.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

math m (plural mathau)

  1. kind, sort, type
    Synonym: siort

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
math fath unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950-), “math”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies