See also: soûler

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

soul +‎ -er

NounEdit

souler (plural soulers)

  1. (historical) A mummer or guiser.
    • 2002, Kerr Cuhulain, Full Contact Magick: A Book of Shadows for the Wiccan Warrior:
      Often the soulers were children, who would sing their ancient souling-songs from door to door in return for gifts or food.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French saüler, from Latin satullāre, present active infinitive of satullō, from satullus, diminutive of satur; cf. saturō, saturāre. Compare Italian satollare (to stuff).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /su.le/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

souler

  1. (transitive) to get (someone) drunk, to inebriate
  2. (transitive, literary) to fill up as if with food
  3. (transitive) to confuse or extenuate with an unending flow of something
  4. (transitive, figuratively) to intoxicate or overexcite
  5. (reflexive) to get drunk, to inebriate one's self
  6. (reflexive) to consume excessively of something; to gorge oneself on something
  7. (transitive, slang) to exasperate
    Cette meuf me soule, elle m'envoie des messages en permanence alors que je m'en fous.
    This chick exasperates me; she keeps sending me messages which I don't care for.

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

VerbEdit

souler

  1. (Jersey) to be used to

Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

souler m (oblique plural soulers, nominative singular soulers, nominative plural souler)

  1. shoe