squabble

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

1600s, probably of North Germanic origin and ultimately imitative.[1]

Related to Swedish dialectal skvabbel (a dispute, quarrel, gossip), Norwegian dialectal skvabba (to prattle), German dialectal schwabbeln (to babble, prattle), Swedish dialectal skvappa (to chide, scold, literally make a splash).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

squabble (plural squabbles)

  1. A minor fight or argument.
    The children got into a squabble about who should ride in the front of the car.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

squabble (third-person singular simple present squabbles, present participle squabbling, simple past and past participle squabbled)

  1. (intransitive) To participate in a minor fight or argument; to quarrel.
    The brothers were always squabbling with each other.
    • 1725, Isaac Watts, Logick: Or, The Right Use of Reason in the Enquiry after Truth, [], 2nd edition, London: [] John Clark and Richard Hett, [], Emanuel Matthews, [], and Richard Ford, [], published 1726, OCLC 1325830848:
      The sense of these propositions is very plain and easy, though logicians might perhaps squabble a whole day whether they should rank them under negative or affirmative.
  2. (transitive, printing) To disarrange, so that the letters or lines stand awry and require readjustment.
    to squabble type

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ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, 1884–1928, and First Supplement, 1933.